SAHO archive

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His Excellency Ayatollah Khomeini, Teheran  Islamic Republic of Iran On behalf of the African National Congress and the oppressed masses of South Africa we express to you our immense joy at...
Your Excellency, The leadership of the African National Congress of South Africa takes this opportunity again to congratulate Your Excellency on your recent election to the high post of Secretary-...
H.E. Sir Geoffrey Howe Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs London. Sir Geoffrey, I am most grateful for your kind letter of 18 July 1986 which has now reached me, and greatly...
We received with great shock and anger the news of the brazen and outrageous invasion of the Kingdom of Lesotho by the racist South African army on December 9th. The multiple murders of Lesotho...
We enclose herewith a copy of a document published by our Information Department exposing the dangerous and sinister policy of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany aimed at perpetuating...
A.B Xuma,the 6th President General of the ANC(1940 - 49) 44th National Conference: Letter on "certain tendencies" from Dr. A. B. Xuma 18 December 1955 The President-General and Delegates...
Author: A.B Xuma
Sindile Moya was head prefect in Zimasa Higher Primary School in Langa during 1976. He was involved in protests on the ground, as well as helping to organise collaborative efforts between different...
Author: Sindile Moya
Thembinkosi Khumalo is a student activist at the University of Pretoria. He is an active PASMA member. PASMA is a student division of PAC. Khumalo is also involved in community upliftment in his...
Author: Thembinkosi Khumalo
Dear Students Movements of 1976, Imagine if the 16th of June 2016, looked like this. Like this cold winters morning in Johannesburg, except across the country. Imagine if the day started with a...
Author: Thenjiwe Mswane
To the Student Movements of 2016 Dear Students, The events witnessed at the country’s tertiary education institutions this year would have been very confusing to a foreign observer. The...
Author: Olehile Bada Pharasi
Dear Student Movements of 1976, (Dear ex-student behind the movement, who made personal sacrifices that affected your own future- without media coverage- while June 16 remains a beacon in our past...
Author: Roanne Moodley
Please allow me yet again to react to the spasms of abject annihilation of sense, meaning and self-respect being played out around the question of the vanishing artworks at the University of Cape...
Author: Breyten Breytenbach
On 31 March, 2016, Chief Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng conveyed the unanimous decision of the Constitutional Court (ConCourt) in the matter of “Economic Freedom Fighters v Speaker of the National...
Author: Thabo Mbeki
Last year on December 15, Max Boqwana, the CEO of the Thabo Mbeki Foundation (TMF), posted a Notice on this Facebook Page that starting in January this year, we would post a number of articles I...
Author: Thabo Mbeki
V During the whole period when GEAR has been challenged “from the left”, the assertion was made that GEAR sought to replace the RDP. I am certain that there is no rational presentation...
Author: Thabo Mbeki
[Last year, I wrote to a comrade to engage him on an article he had written in one of the local newspapers to engage him on one of the issues he raised, i.e. as a country, “we self-imposed...
Author: Thabo Mbeki

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Latest Videos in the Archive

The Mafika Pascal Gwala Annual lecture was initiated by South African History Online in 2015 and is run in partnership with both the University of Kwa Zulu Natal (UKZN) and the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS). 

Gwala was a prominent South African poet, activist and intellectual whose life and work played a leading role in giving form to the debate about ‘a people’s culture’ in the 1970’s and 1980’s.

The primary aim of these lectures is to inspire the present generation of artists and academics to revisit the pivotal role of artists in promoting debate on human rights issues. The lecture series is in line with South African History Online’s objective of compiling a comprehensive history of the arts.

Rose Sonto describes student organizing in his high school in Malteno, in the Eastern Cape, in 1969, well before the Soweto Uprising of 1976. The main political influence on him at that time was the Black Consciousness Movement.

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