SAHO archive

Displaying 1 - 20 of 98
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This is a pamphlet containing the statement accepted for distribution by the SACC, April 6, 1985 regarding theological rationale and a call to prayer for the end to unjust rule. It is reproduced in...
Publication date: 1985-04-16
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An Emergency Convocation of Churches was decided upon to work on and develop effective non-violent actions to pressure the government to the negotiation table and for the church to refuse to...
Publication date: 1988-05-30
Publisher: South African Council of Churches
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With the official opening of the Sultan Technical College, the members of the College Council had taken a decision to prohibit the African students from attending classes and were refused admission...
Author: Society of Young Africa
Publication date: 1956-00-00
Publisher: SOYA, Durban
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June 12th marked a historic moment in the history of Black students. The University of the Western Cape acting together with the Department of Coloured Affairs expelled students of the University of...
Author: South African Students Organisation
Publication date: 1973-06-00
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Pamphlet about the comparison between responses made to calls for sanctions against Argentina and South Africa. Note that large sections of the text are barely legible
Publication date: 1982-04-00
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Pamphlet issued by the National Executive Committee of the African National Congress. Call to the nation saying that change in South Africa is moving at a rapid pace and that intensified struggle is...
Author: African National Congress
Publication date: 1985-04-25
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This is a pamphlet about family and educational background of Nelson Mandela. It also consists of information about the ANCYL, the defiance campaign, the treason trial, Umkhonto we Sizwe, and the...
Publication date: 1988-07-18
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This pamphlet discusses the bus boycott by the people of Alexandra Township against a penny increase in fares. But, the oppressed are using this bus boycott to fight also against Bantu education;...
Author: Society of Young Africa
Publication date: 1957-00-00
Publisher: SOYA, Durban
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Pamphlet, in Afrikaans, discussing the press publicity after announcing their stance in rejecting apartheid as it cannot be reconciled with the Word of God
Publication date: 1973-11-16
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Pamphlet on a Consultation of representatives of SACC member churches, held at the Koinonia Conference Centre, Johannesburg,10-12 May 1982 for a follow up to the consultation on racism held in...
Publication date: 1982-05-10
Publisher: South African Council of Churches
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Pamphlet about the Nyanga East Men's Hostel Association and their struggle for better living conditions
Author: Seleoane, Mandla
Publication date: 1985-05-00
Publisher: Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit
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African National Congress Constitutional guidelines for a democratic South Africa. Issued by the ANC in Lusaka.
Author: African National Congress
Publication date: 1989-00-00
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This pamphlets tries to highlight a series of events that the Pan African Congress (PAC)has been involved with in relation to the freedom struggle of the oppressed in South Africa and the formation...
Publication date: 1960-09-01
Publisher: Non-European Unity Movement: Queenstown
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The Southern African Catholic Bishops, in their Plenary Session of 4 February 1974, recommended that these pamphlets be studied as part of a pledge of reconciliation, between God and man and between...
Author: P Butelezi
Publication date: 1974-00-00
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Document outlining the basic elements of constitutional change in South Africa, disclosed by Prime Minister P W Botha on 31st July, 1982. Includes diagram of Central Government structure.
Publication date: 1982-07-31
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Pamphlet of the SA Catholic Bishops Conference explaining its call for an end to conscription.
Publication date: 1985-08-00
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Pamphlet covering the background of the Campaign, goals of the Campaign, areas of possible non-violent action, organisational structure, organisational chart etc.
Publication date: 1989-01-00
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This pamphlet clearly describes, with some background, on the political state of the country before the birth of APDUSA. The NEUM called on the leadership of the Movement to a conference in which the...
Author: African Peoples Democratic Union of South Africa
Publication date: 1961-03-00
Publisher: APDUSA, East London

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Art is an act of resistance. It asserts our agency. Omar Badsha has identified not only as an artist, but an activist for most of his life. Born in 1945, he grew up under the oppression of apartheid, facing injustice on a daily basis. He was harassed, his work was banned, and his movement was restricted. But Badsha fought back with photography. Today his work as a historian is ensuring that the truth of our past, and our future, remains free.     

Badsha discovered his love of politics through his father, being raised in a house where activists came to meet. He had dreams of studying art abroad, but in 1965 was denied a passport by the government. Nevertheless, he continued to create, and that same year one of his woodcuts won the first of many awards. As a man well known for his doggedness, veracity, and humanity, Badsha refused to exhibit his drawings and paintings in segregated galleries. When he joined the trade union movement he turned his eye to photography. Badsha’s first book of photographs, Letter to Farzanah, was banned after release. Now freely accessible, his book depicts the lives of South African children of all races and backgrounds during apartheid. “We came out of a society where our history was actually erased, totally, not recognised,” he says. “But we turned it around during the anti-apartheid struggle.”

Badsha’s extensive photographic work has been exhibited globally, and it’s his emotive images of ordinary people that illustrate the heart behind his activism. In the 1990s, Badsha was finally given his first passport. It was only valid for three months, but the freedom he fought for came soon after as South Africa held its first democratic elections on 27 April 1994. He then founded South African History Online, a non-profit project dedicated to preserving an open history of our country. It’s the largest website of its kind in Africa, and has a virtual classroom to help teach children. In 2017, Badsha was awarded an honorary doctorate by Stellenbosch University. His work serves as a reminder that the pain of our past is not to be forgotten. Instead, it is the key to our future, and our freedom.

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