SAHO archive

Displaying 41 - 60 of 27541
From: Freedom Fighter and Humanist by Denis Goldberg
Author: Zweledinga Pallo Jordan
From: Freedom Fighter and Humanist by Denis Goldberg
Author: Eberhard Neugebohrn
From: Freedom Fighter and Humanist by Denis Goldberg
Author: Denis Theodore Goldberg
From: Freedom Fighter and Humanist by Denis Goldberg
Author: Ahmed Kathrada
From: Freedom Fighter and Humanist by Denis Goldberg
Author: Makhenkesi Arnold Stofile
A Tribute to Denis Goldberg Preface Foreword Chapter 1 A Marvellous Life! Denis Goldberg, South Africa and the World Chapter 2 Denis Goldberg and the Modern Youth Society Chapter 3 The Life...
Author: Denis Goldberg
Sam Goldberg is dead. But he lives on. One of the characters in the sell-out play, “Cincinatti”, was based on Sam, who died in Johannesburg this week. Sam was alisted person under the Suppression of...
Author: Denis Goldberg
My thanks to Professor Goerling for inviting me to present this paper to the conference on Torture and the Future. Torture has recently been often in the news because of the revelations of the use of...
Author: Denis Goldberg
Comments and Personal Observations written in December 1991 as part of group reports at the end of our studies at Institut Tadbiram Awam Negara (INTAN), the Malaysian Government Civil Service...
Author: Denis Goldberg
It is with a sense of great honour, and great pleasure, that we greet the people of Palestine and their leading organisation, the Palestine Liberation Organisation, on this most important occasion....
Author: Denis Goldberg
I made notes in November 2002 for use in future speeches on Palestine and Israel, nearly 9 years later they are equally valid: We in SA know about racial oppression We fought it and defeated it...
Author: Denis Goldberg
Leaflet issued by the Command of Umkhonto we Sizwe, 16th December 1961 Units of Umkhonto we Sizwe today carried out planned attacks against government installations, particularly those connected...
Author: Denis Goldberg
Preface In the decade preceding the dramatic February 1990 unbanning of South Africa’s black liberatory movements, many hundreds of concerned South Africans undertook to make contact with exile...
Author: Michael Savage
Author: Julie Parle and Vanessa Noble
Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Occasional Publications of the Natal Society Foundation
We, the People of South Africa, declare for all our country and the world to know: that South Africa belongs to all who live in it, black and white, and that no government can justly claim authority...
Table Mountain and the curved spine of hills associated with it define the city of Cape Town. The prevailing summer and winter winds, from the south east and northwest respectively, had carved the...
Author: Zweledinga Pallo Jordan
In pre-colonial times South Africa was occupied by Khoisan people in the west and Bantu speaking people in the east. 1652 Jan van Riebeeck landed at the Cape with 90 soldiers to establish a...
Author: Denis Goldberg
Comrade Mendi Msimang and the family and relatives, Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe, Ministers, Premiers, Deputy Ministers and MECs, Ministers from within SADC and other foreign dignitaries...
Author: Jacob Zuma
Publication date: 22 December, 2009

Pages

Latest Videos in the Archive

Art is an act of resistance. It asserts our agency. Omar Badsha has identified not only as an artist, but an activist for most of his life. Born in 1945, he grew up under the oppression of apartheid, facing injustice on a daily basis. He was harassed, his work was banned, and his movement was restricted. But Badsha fought back with photography. Today his work as a historian is ensuring that the truth of our past, and our future, remains free.     

Badsha discovered his love of politics through his father, being raised in a house where activists came to meet. He had dreams of studying art abroad, but in 1965 was denied a passport by the government. Nevertheless, he continued to create, and that same year one of his woodcuts won the first of many awards. As a man well known for his doggedness, veracity, and humanity, Badsha refused to exhibit his drawings and paintings in segregated galleries. When he joined the trade union movement he turned his eye to photography. Badsha’s first book of photographs, Letter to Farzanah, was banned after release. Now freely accessible, his book depicts the lives of South African children of all races and backgrounds during apartheid. “We came out of a society where our history was actually erased, totally, not recognised,” he says. “But we turned it around during the anti-apartheid struggle.”

Badsha’s extensive photographic work has been exhibited globally, and it’s his emotive images of ordinary people that illustrate the heart behind his activism. In the 1990s, Badsha was finally given his first passport. It was only valid for three months, but the freedom he fought for came soon after as South Africa held its first democratic elections on 27 April 1994. He then founded South African History Online, a non-profit project dedicated to preserving an open history of our country. It’s the largest website of its kind in Africa, and has a virtual classroom to help teach children. In 2017, Badsha was awarded an honorary doctorate by Stellenbosch University. His work serves as a reminder that the pain of our past is not to be forgotten. Instead, it is the key to our future, and our freedom.

External Archives