History of elections in South Africa

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The 2014 national and provincial election results

South Africa’s 2014 national and provincial elections were announced at the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) centre in Pretoria on 10 May 2014. The number of registered voters was 25 388 082, the number of votes counted was 18 654 771. Out of 29 political parties who contested the elections, only 13 political parties – African National Congress (ANC), Democratic Alliance (DA), the new comer Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF), Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP), National Freedom Party (NFP), United Democratic Movement (UDM), Freedom Front Plus (FF+), Congress of the People (COPE), African Independent Congress (AIC), Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) and African People’s Convention (APC)  won seats in the National Assembly.

The national results for South Africa showed that the ANC had won the 2014 national elections with a great majority. The ANC had 11 436 921 valid votes – 62.15% of the total votes, and won 249 seats in the National Assembly, the DA had 4 091 584 valid votes, 22.23% of the total votes, and won 89 seats in the National Assembly, and the newly formed party, Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) had 1 169 259 valid votes, 6.35%, with 25 seats in the National Assembly, and the IFP had 44 1 854 valid votes, 2.40% with 10 seats in the National Assembly, followed by National Freedom Party (NFP) with 288 742 valid votes, 1.57% with 6 seats in the National Assembly.

The UDM received 184 636 valid votes (1.00% of the total votes), and won 4 seats in the National Assembly, the Freedom Front Plus (VF+) received 165 715 valid votes (0.90% of the total votes), and won 4 seats in the National Assembly, COPE received 123 235 votes (0.67% of the total votes), and won 3 seats in the National Assembly, the African Christian Democratic Party (ACDP) received 104 039 valid votes (0.57% of the total votes), and won 3 seats in the National Assembly, the African Independent Congress (AIC) received 97 642 valid votes (0.53% of the total votes) and won 3 seats in the National Assembly, Agang SA had 52 350 valid votes (0.21% of the total votes) and won 2 seats in the National Assembly, Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) had 37 784 valid votes (0.21% of the total votes) and won 1 seat in the National Assembly, and the African People’s Convention (APC) had 30 676 valid votes (0.17% of the total votes) and who 1 seat in the National Assembly.

The provincial results showed that the ANC won 8 provinces and the DA retained the Western Cape Province. In the Northern Cape, the ANC received 272 053 valid votes (64.4% of the total votes) and won 20 seats in the Provincial Legislature, the DA came second with 100 916 valid votes (23.9% of the total votes) and won 7 seats, and the EFF came third with 20 951 valid votes (5% of the total votes) and won 2 seats, followed by COPE with 20 951 valid votes (3.6% of the total votes) and won 1 seat. In Gauteng, the ANC received 2 348 564 valid votes (53.6% of the total votes) and won 40 seats, the DA came second with 1 349 001 valid votes (30.8% of the total votes) and won 23 seats; the EFF came third with 451 318 valid votes (10.3% of the total votes) and won 8 seats, followed by Freedom Front Plus with 52 436 valid votes (10.30% of the total votes) and won 1 seat, and IFP received 34 240 valid votes (0.78% of the total votes) and won 1 seat.

In Mpumalanga Province, the ANC received 1 045 409 valid votes (78.2% of the total votes) and won 24 seats, the DA came second with 138 990 valid votes (10.4% of the votes) and won 3 seats, followed by the EFF with 83 589 valid votes (6.3% of the total votes) and won 2 seats, and the Bushbuckridge Residents Association received 15 368 valid votes (1, 2% of the total votes) and won 1 seat. In the Western Cape Province, DA received 1 259 645 valid votes (59.38% of the total votes and won 26 seats, ANC received 697 664 valid votes (32.89% of the total votes) and won 14 seats, EFF received 44 762 valid votes (2.11% of the total votes) and won 1 seats, followed by ACDP with 21 696 valid votes (1.02% of the total votes) and won 1 seat.

In KwaZulu-Natal Province, the ANC received 2 475 041 valid votes (64.52% of the total votes) and won 52 seats, the DA replaced the IFP as the official opposition in the Provincial Parliament receiving 489 430 valid votes (12.76% of the total votes) and won 10 seats, and the IFP came third with 416 496 valid votes (10.86% of the total votes) and won 9 seats, followed by the NFP with 280 425 valid votes (7.31% of the total votes) and won 6 seats, followed by EFF with 70 823 valid votes (1.85% of the total votes), and MF with 38 960 valid votes (1.02% of the total votes) and won 1 seat.

 In the Eastern Cape Province, the ANC received 1 528 345 valid votes (70, 09% of the total votes) and won 45 seats in the provincial legislature, the DA came second with 353 316 valid votes (16.2% of the total votes) and won 10 seats in the Provincial Legislature, followed by the UDM with  134 280 valid votes (6.16% of the total votes) and won 4 seats, the EFF with 75 776 valid votes ( 3.48% of the total  votes) and won 2 seats, COPE with 26 129 valid votes ( 1.2% of the total votes) and won 1 seat, and the AIC with 16 786 valid votes ( 0.77% of the total votes) and won 1 seat.

In the Free State Province, the ANC received 708 720 valid votes (69.85% of the total votes) and won 22 seats in the Provincial Legislature, the DA came second with 164 672 valid votes (16.23% of the total votes) and won 5 seats, followed by the EFF with 82 674 valid votes (8.15% of the total votes) and won 2 seats, and the FF+ with 21 339 valid votes (2.1% of the total votes) and won 1 seat. In Limpopo Province, the ANC won provincial elections with 1 149 348 valid votes (78.6% of the total votes) and won 39 seats. The EFF came second with 156 982 valid votes (10.74% of the total votes), and won 6 seats, followed by the DA with 94 724 valid votes (6.48% of the total votes), and won 3 seats, and COPE with 12 573 valid votes (0, 86% of the total votes) and won 1 seat.  In the North West Province, the ANC received 733 490 valid votes (67. 39% of the total votes), and won 23 seats, the EFF came second with 143 765 valid votes (13.21% of the total votes) and won 5 seats, followed by the DA with 138 521 valid votes (12.73% of the total votes) and won 4 seats and the FF+ with 18 746 valid votes (1.72% of the total votes) and won 1 seat.

South African living overseas had voted in the majority for the DA than the ANC and other parties. The DA received the majority of the of expatriate votes, 84.44%, the ANC had received 8.32% of expatriate votes, Agang SA had received 0.28% of expatriate votes and the EFF had received 1.81% of the expatriate votes. Majority of the votes came from London, where more than 2 000 South African were registered to vote. 

National results for South Africa 2014 elections      

Political parties

Valid votes

seats

% vote

ANC   

11 436 921

249

62.15%

DA  

4 091 584

89

22.23%

EFF  

1 169 259

25

6.35%

IFP  

441 854

10

2.40%

NFP

288 742

6

1.57%

>UDM  

184 636

4

1.00%

VF Plus  

165 715

4

0.90%

On 21 May 2014, South Africa’s fifth democratic parliament held its first sitting to swear in new Member of Parliament (MPs), and formally elect the Speaker, Deputy Speaker and the President of the country.  Chief Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng presided over the swearing in of the 400 new MPs. The House elected a new speaker. The African National Congress (ANC) nominated Baleka Mbete for the position of speaker of the National Assembly. The Democratic Alliance (DA) nominated former Eastern Cape Premier, Nosimo Balindlela.

Two people were nominated for the position of the Speaker. This meant that the position of Speaker had to be decided upon by secret vote.  The MPs cast their votes. There were 366 ballots cast of which 18 were invalid. Mbete won with 260 votes compared to Balindlela who received 88 votes. Mbete was elected as the new speaker. Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs Minister, Lechesa Tsenoli, was elected unopposed as Deputy Speaker, followed by the unopposed election of the President, Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma for the second term as head of the state.   

On 24 May 2014, South Africa’s fifth democratic President, Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma, was inaugurated at the Union Building in Pretoria, Gauteng Province by Chief Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng.

A South African Airways (SAA) Airbus A340-600 Aircraft performed a fly-over. The aircraft was accompanied by the South African Air Force Silver Falcon flying in formation over the Nelson Mandela Amphitheatre. 


References:
• Election 2014 results. (Online). http://www.news24.com/Elections/Results#map=live. [Accessed on 13 May 2014].
• ANC wins Gauteng but supporters drops. (Online). http://www.citypress.co.za/politics/anc-wins-gauteng-support-drops. [Accessed on 13 May 2014]. 
• Engelbrecht, N. (2014). 13 parties get National Assembly seats. (Online). http://www.news24.com/Elections/News/13-parties-get-National-Assembly-seats-20140510. [Accessed on 12 May 2014].
• 2014 National and Provincial results. (Online). http://www.elections.org.za/resultsNPE2014/. [Accessed on 12 May 2014].
• Grant, R. (2014). A brief history of political opposition in the National Assembly. (Online). http://mg.co.za/data/2014-05-12-a-brief-history-of-the-opposition-in-the-national-assembly. [accessed on 13 May 2014]. 
• Inaugurations get underway. (Online): http://ewn.co.za/2014/05/24/Inauguration-set-to-get-underway. [Accessed 26 May 2014].
• New MPs officially sworn in. (online): http://ewn.co.za/2014/05/21/MPs-sworn-in. [Accessed 22 May 2014].
• Zuma Sworn in for second term as President. (Online):
• http://www.news24.com/elections/news/zuma-sworn-in-for-second-term-as-president-20140524. [Accessed on 26 May 2014]. 

Last updated : 29-May-2014

This article was produced for South African History Online on 15-May-2014