Boschendal Wine Estate

Boschendal Wine Estate Image source

Working with nature, producing real food and a simple farm lifestyle is at the heart of Boschendal. One of the oldest farms in South Africa, founded in 1685, the farm has grown with the passing centuries into a cherished source of wholesome produce, great wines and happy memories. 
In 2013 Boschendal was acquired by new owners, led by Sam and Rob Lundie, with the intention of rejuvinating this magnificent property. Over the past four years they have attracted a team of talented people who share their dream of making Boschendal into a top agricultural farm; a farm that produces sought after naturally produced food and great wines; and a farm where the natural environment thrives and local communities prosper.
Set in the Drakenstein Valley surrounded by dramatic mountain landscapes, lush gardens and vines, the original farmstead complex is now a national monument with a rich and intriguing history of more than 300 years. Today, Boschendal is a Cape winelands icon and an acclaimed wine and food destination. Our vineyards and fruit trees have been joined by vegetable gardens and a growing herd of free range, 100% pasture fed Angus cattle reflecting our commitment to serving wholesome farm-to-table food.
Guest accommodation is also a recent addition to the farm with luxurious cottage accommodation ranging from the exclusive and historic Rhodes Cottage built by Sir Herbert Baker to the elegantly restored Werf Cottages.
Cottage guests enjoy access to the entire farm where they can walk and cycle on trails through mountain fynbos, dine under the stars, have picnics and sundowners in exclusive areas, fly-fish in the dams and swim in pristine mountain water.
The Drakenstein Valley was inhabited by nomadic Khoisan communities for tens of centuries prior to colonisation of the Cape. Boschendal was first granted to the French Huguenot Jean le Long in 1685 by Simon van der Stel, the first governor of the Cape Colony. It was subsequently bought by Abraham de Villiers in 1715 and remained in that family for 164 years.
The De Villiers family developed Boschendal into a flourishing wine farm and built the manor house and outbuildings. In 1897 custodianship of Boschendal passed into the hands of the mining magnate Cecil John Rhodes who saw a lucrative opportunity in fruit farming. Rhodes Fruit Farms was established and began exporting deciduous fruit to Britain on a large scale. In 1976 the beautifully restored Boschendal farmstead and winery was opened to the public for the first time and began to emerge as the icon it is today of the Cape winelands.
Google map: 

Last updated : 04-Sep-2017

This article was produced for South African History Online on 04-Sep-2017