SA Soccer timeline 1862-1974

1862 Á‚ 

The first documented football matches in South Africa are played in Cape Town and Port Elizabeth (between White civil servants and soldiers).

1862  

The first documented football matches in South Africa are played in Cape Town and Port Elizabeth (between White civil servants and soldiers).


1879  

Pietermaritzburg County Football Club (Whites-only) is established.


1880  

African and Indian soccer clubs are active in Durban and Johannesburg


1882   Natal Football Association (Whites-only) is founded.


1892  

The Whites-only South African Football Association (later known as FASA) is formed.


1896  

Indian football clubs come together to form the Transvaal Indian Football Association.


1897  


1898  

The Orange Free State Bantu Football Club tours England, becoming the first South African team to play in Europe.


1902  

 


 


 






1932  

The South African African Football Association (SAAFA) is formed and it launches the Bakers Cup national tournament.


1933  

The South African Bantu Football Association (SABFA) and the South African Coloured Football Association (SACFA) are formed.


1934  

Motherwell, a Scottish professional side, tours South Africa for a second time, after an earlier visit in 1931.


1935  

The Transvaal Inter-Race Soccer Board is formed by Africans, Indians, and Coloureds.

The Suzman Cup, the first official inter-racial tournament between Africans, Coloureds, and Indians, is established.

 


1936   The Godfrey South African Challenge Cup is established


1937  

Orlando Pirates is founded.

The SAAFA's (South African African Football Association) Bakers Cup is renamed the Moroka-Baloyi Cup.

 


1940  

The Inter Race Soccer Board organises a few games between the various racially divided soccer associations.

A referee is killed by spectators at the Bantu Sports Club, Johannesburg.

 


1944  

The African National Congress sponsors the first soccer match at the Bantu Sports Club.


1946  

The Natal Inter-Race Soccer Board is established with the help of Albert Luthuli.


1947   The soccer team Moroka Swallows is founded.


1950  

In Elisabethville, Belgian Congo, Katanga defeats the Johannesburg Bantu Football Association (8-0) in an unofficial African football championship.


1951  

SAAFA (South African African Football Association), SAIFA (South African Indian Football Association) and SACFA (South African Coloured Football Association) form the anti-apartheid South African Soccer Federation (SASF).


1952  

The South African Football Association (SAFA) (representing Whites) is admitted to Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA).


1953  

The Durban & District African Football Association wins the Rhodes Centenary tournament in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe).


1955  

Topper Brown, a British coach, leads Natal Africans to victory in both the Moroka-Baloyi Cup and the Natal Inter-Race Singh Cup.


1956  

 

Minister of the Interior, T. E. Donges, articulates the first apartheid sport policy.

The South African Football Association (SAFA) changes its name to the Football Association of Southern Africa (FASA) and, due to pressure from FIFA, deletes the racist exclusionary clause from its constitution.

Stephen "Kalamazoo" Mokone and David Julius become the first Black South Africans to sign professional contracts in Europe, with Cardiff City and Sporting Lisbon respectively.

 


1958  

The South African Bantu Football Association (SABFA) affiliates with the Football Association of Southern Africa (FASA).

Darius Dhlomo joins Stephen Mokone at Heracles in the Dutch professional league.

The Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA) officially recognises the Football Association of South Africa (FASA) as the sole governing body of soccer in South Africa

 


1959  

The National Football League (NFL) is launched as the country's first entirely professional club league. It is reserved for Whites.


1959 May   Orlando Stadium opens.


1960  

The Confederation of African Football (CAF) expels South Africa.

South African Women's football starts.

 


1961  

FIFA suspends the Football Association of South Africa (FASA).

FASA includes some Black players within its structure. African, Indian, and Coloured officials in the anti-apartheid South African Soccer Federation (SASF) form the anti-racist professional South African Soccer League (SASL). SABFA (the South African Bantu Football Association) launches a National Professional Soccer League (NPSL), which shuts down the following year.

 


1962  

Eleven fans die at Jeppe Station, Johannesburg, following a Moroka Swallows -- Orlando Pirates derby at Natalspruit.

10,000 spectators in Maseru (Lesotho, then Basotholand) watch the Whites-only Germiston Callies defeat the Black Pirates (3-1).

Orlando Pirates Women's Football Club and Mother City Girls are among the first (short-lived) Black women's football teams.

 


1963  

The FIFA executive lifts the Football Association of South Africa's (FASA) suspension. FASA announces it will send an all-White team to the 1966 World Cup, and an all-Black team to the 1970 World Cup. FIFA president Stanley Rous gets FASA temporarily reinstated in 1963, but FASA is again suspended in 1964. It is expelled from FIFA in 1976.


1964  

FASA's (Football Association of South Africa) suspension is re-imposed by the FIFA Congress. The Federation leadership is persecuted, arrested, or banned.

Avalon Athletic win the SASL (South African Soccer League) double (League and Cup titles). Eric "Scara" Sono dies in a car crash at the age of 27.

The Pretoria Sundowns soccer team is revived.

 


1965  

Moroka Swallows win their first national championship (SASL - South African Soccer League).

Leeds United winger Albert "Hurry-Hurry" Johanneson becomes the first Black South African (indeed the first Black ever) to play in an English FA Cup final (against Liverpool).

 


1966  

The anti-racist SASL (South African Soccer League) folds due to lack of playing grounds.


1969  

The Apartheid regime cancels a match between White champions Highlands Park and Orlando Pirates in Mbabane, Swaziland. The racist Football Association of South Africa's (FASA) reputation and international standing is seriously damaged as FIFA had sanctioned the match.

The South African Soccer Federation forms a six-team professional league.

 


1970   Coloured and Indian players are purged from African clubs.

South Africa is expelled from the Olympic Movement.


1971  

The National Professional Soccer League (NPSL) launches the Keg League (later renamed Castle League), sponsored by South African Breweries.

Kaizer Motaung's All-Star XI is renamed Kaizer Chiefs.

 


1972  

Bernard "Dancing Shoes" Hartze (Cape Town Spurs, Federation Professional league) sets a South African record for a single season goal-scoring average: 35 goals in 16 matches."


1972 July    

The Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA) informs the non-racial South African Soccer Federation (SASF), led by Mr. Norman Middleton, that its application for membership arrived too late to be placed before the next congress of FIFA in August. FIFA also clarifies that the White Football Association of South Africa had not been suspended for contravening its rules but because of South African Government policy. Acceptance of FIFA would have meant expulsion of FASA (Football Association of South Africa).


1972 August    

The Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA) executive gives special permission to the Football Association of South Africa to have overseas teams participate in the South African Games in Pretoria in 1973, asking for assurance that Blacks would be allowed to watch the games. (South Africa has friends in the FIFA executive; its position in the FIFA Congress is weak. Congress approval was not necessary for the above special permission and the matter was not mentioned at the FIFA Congress in Paris.)


1973 26 January    

The Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA) announced, after a postal ballot of the executive committee, to allow foreign teams to go to South Africa to participate in the South African Games in March.


1973 11 February    

The Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA) withdraws the special permission it had given to amateur football teams to take part in the South African Games to be held in Pretoria in March-April 1973, when it becomes clear that FASA is planning separate teams for different ethnic groups. FIFA had temporarily lifted suspension on the Football Association of South Africa (FASA) on the understanding that the Games would be multi-racial.


1973 25 May    

The Minister of Sport and Recreation, Dr. P.G.J. Koornhof, announces in the House of Assembly that the Government had given approval "for the staging in 1974 of an open national soccer tournament in which the different South African nations can participate on a multinational basis. This is that a South African representative white team, a South African representative Coloured team, a South African representative Indian team and a South African representative Zulu, Xhosa or any other Bantu (sic) national team can compete in the tournament."

A Whites-only team beats a Blacks-only team twice in the "multi-national" South African Games (4-0; 3-1) at the Rand Stadium, Johannesburg.

 


1974      

A Whites-only team defeats a Blacks-only team (2-0) in the Embassy Multinational Series at the Rand Stadium.


1974 3 June    

Mr. Norman Middleton, president of the South African Soccer Federation, is refused a passport to attend a meeting of the International Football Federation (FINA) in Frankfurt on 11 June. He had refused to give an undertaking to the Minister of the Interior that he would do nothing to harm South African sport at the Frankfurt meeting. He said he considered the issue of a conditional passport to be "blackmail."


1974 14 October    

The Minister of Sport, Dr. Piet Koornhof, says in the House of Assembly that the Government's aim is to move away from discrimination in sport, disclosing that a "champion of champions" soccer tournament would be held, probably in February: "White and non-White clubs could take part". Further, he invites the major cricketing bodies for round table talks on their problems. He confirms that a Black boxer would meet a White boxer for the South African championship. Under specific questioning, he replied that the Coloured Proteas could play against the Rugby Springboks any time.


1974 6 November    

The executive committee of the International Football Federation (FIFA) rejects an Ethiopian proposal to expel South Africa. It decides that the matter can be dealt with only at the next congres

The famous English amateur soccer team 'Corinthians' tours South Africa (and again in 1903 and 1906).

Last updated : 04-May-2012

This article was produced for South African History Online on 04-Apr-2011