Alexander Macaulay Jabavu

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Biographical information

Synopsis:

Political activist, member of the ICU

First name: 
Alexander
Middle name: 
Macaulay
Last name: 
Jabavu
Date of birth: 
1889
Location of birth: 
King Williams' Town,Eastern Cape,South Africa
Date of death: 
1946

Alexander Macaulay Jabavu was born in 1889 in King William's Town, he was the second son of John Tengo Jabavu. After studying at Lovedale, he taught briefly, then on his father's death in 1921 took over Imvo Zabantsundu, which he edited until 1940. In about 1925 he joined the Industrial and Commercial Workers' Union of Clements Kadalie and soon became one of its vice-presidents. He was a treasurer of the Cape Native Voters' Convention, a founder and official of the Location Advisory Boards Congress, and from 1935 to 1937 a member of the executive committee of the All African Convention, of which his brother, D. D. T. Jabavu, was president.He served on the Ciskei Bunga and on the Natives' Representative Council for the rural areas of the Cape Province from 1937 to 1942.

In 1935 Imvo was bought by the Bantu Press but continued as its editor,based in King William's Town,until 1940.In 1926 Jabavu was appointed one of the vice-president of Clements KIand CWU,which he regard as the only genuine mass African organization as well as the only one that stood ,at least in theory ,for Africans' economic development.In 1928 he helped found the Location Advisory Board Congress,of which he became chairperson.He died in 1946.


References:
• Gerhart G.M and Karis T. (ed)(1977). From Protest to challenge: A documentary History of African Politics in South Africa: 1882-1964, Vol.4 Political Profiles 1882 ”“ 1964. Hoover Institution Pres: Stanford University.
• Gail M. Gerhart, Teresa Barnes, Antony Bugg-Levine, Thomas Karis, Nimrod Mkele .From Protest to Challenge 4-Political Profiles (1882-1990) http://www.jacana.co.za/component/virtuemart/?keyword=from+protest+to+ch... (last accessed 12 February 2019)

Last updated : 12-Feb-2019

This article was produced by South African History Online on 17-Feb-2011

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