This Day in History

 18 October →
Wednesday, October 18, 2000
222

Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (EHF) is a serious and aggressive disease characterised by severe flu-like symptoms, vomiting, diarrhoea, headaches, haemorrhaging and possibly coma. The disease got its name from the Ebola River in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where it was first found.

This article was produced by South African History Online on 08-Oct-2013

This Day in History Extra Dates
  • Monday, October 18, 2004
    South African cellular phone company MTN will announce a $12-million sponsorship of African soccer's major events at a news conference in Cairo on Thursday, 28 October, according to sources close to the agreement. MTN will take over as the title sponsors of the next two African Nations Cup finals in Egypt in 2006 and Ghana in 2008 and of the African Champions League until 2010.
    References:

  • Saturday, October 18, 2003
    Low turnout in parliamentary elections in Swaziland.
    References:
    • BBC, (2004). 'Key Dates', Focus on Africa, January to March, v. 15 no 1, p. 8

  • Thursday, October 18, 2001
    Four Osama bin Laden followers convicted in the 1998 bombings of two US embassies in Africa are sentenced in New York to life without parole.
    References:
    • Pretoria News, 18 October 2003. Today in History.

  • Wednesday, October 18, 2000
    Health officials launch an intensive effort to find the origins of an outbreak of Ebola fever in Uganda.
  • Wednesday, October 18, 2000
    Fighting between Nigeria's Hausa and Yoruba tribes leaves 100 dead in Lagos. (2004). Yesterdays, Pretoria News, 18 October.

  • Wednesday, October 18, 2000
    President Thabo Mbeki pays a state visit to Rwanda.
    References:

  • Monday, October 18, 1999
    Former SA President Nelson Mandela begins his first visit to Israel, a gesture of final reconciliation with a nation that had backed South Africa's apartheid regime.
    References:
    • Pretoria News, 18 October 2003. Today in History.

  • Sunday, October 18, 1998
    A train is derailed and ploughs through a town near Alexandria, Egypt, killing forty-seven and injuring one hundred people.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Saturday, October 18, 1997
    The Red Cross begins picking bodies up off the shattered streets of Brazzaville, Republic of Congo, following four months of fighting that ended with an ex-dictator returning to power.
    References:

  • Wednesday, October 18, 1995
    Libya announces that it will deport over one million Africans.
  • Sunday, October 18, 1992
    A team of twelve Commonwealth observers, including high-ranking officers from military and police, a former Government Minister, and a director from a criminology institute, arrive in South Africa. The team, which was led by Ghana Supreme Court Judge Austin Missah, will stay for a period of three months.
  • Thursday, October 18, 1990
    Political assassination: Nomsa Mapongwana (34), wife of chair of the UDF affiliated Western Cape Civic Organisation, Michael Mapongwana, dies from a bullet wound in the chest.
    References:
    • Coleman, M. (ed) (1998). A Crime Against Humanity: analysing the repression of the apartheid state, Johannesburg: Human Rights Committee.

  • Thursday, October 18, 1990
    Natal state of emergency lifted.
  • Friday, October 18, 1985
    Ngwako Ramalepe, president of the SRC, Modjadji Teacher Training College, dies in police custody after first being assaulted by police at the station and later dumped along a road.
    References:
    • Coleman, M. (ed) (1998). A Crime Against Humanity: analysing the repression of the apartheid state, Johannesburg: Human Rights Committee.

  • Friday, October 18, 1985
    South African authorities hang Black activist and poet Benjamin Moloise for allegedly killing a police officer.
  • Thursday, October 18, 1984
    Member of UK Parliament Donald Anderson, one of the Labour Party's spokesmen on foreign affairs, told a news conference after a five-day visit to South Africa that he believed South Africa's system of legalised racial segregation could not last. Mr. Anderson urged Britain to use economic leverage for change before the White-ruled country exploded into racial violence.
  • Wednesday, October 18, 1978
    Forces of the White Rhodesian regime attack a nationalist guerrilla base in Mozambique, killing over 200 people.
    References:
    • Bute, E.L. & Harmer, H.J.P. (1997). The Black Handbook, London: Cassell.

  • Tuesday, October 18, 1977
    A German anti-terrorist unit storms a hi-jacked Lufthansa airliner at Mogadishu airport, Somalia. Three Palestinian terrorists are killed in a shoot-out. Everybody in the plane is saved, except the pilot.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau
    •  https://africanhistory.about.com/

  • Monday, October 18, 1971
    The seventh Summit Conference of the East and Central African states, held in Mogadishu (18-19 Oct), adopts a Declaration urging armed struggle to liberate Southern Africa, to which they grant total support. The leaders of the ANC, Alfred Nzo and the PAC welcome this rejection of South Africa's dialogue policy.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds) (1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Tuesday, October 18, 1966
    The Rand Afrikaans University (RAU), second university with its seat in Johannesburg (after the University of the Witwatersrand), is established by an act of parliament.
    References:
    • Potgieter, D.J. et al. (eds) (1970). Standard Encyclopaedia of Southern Africa, Cape Town: NASOU, v. 9, p.238.

  • Monday, October 18, 1965
    Burundi prime minister, Léopold Biha, is wounded in an attack on the King's palace by army mutineers.
    References:
    • Bute, E.L. & Harmer, H.J.P. (1997). The Black Handbook, London: Cassell.

  • Sunday, October 18, 1964
    Pope Paul VI proclaims 22 new African saints. The saints, known as the Blessed Martyrs of Uganda, were a group of converts who were persecuted and martyred in 1885-87.
    References:

  • Thursday, October 18, 1962
    The USA urges the general meeting of the UN to denounce South Africa's apartheid policy.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Wednesday, October 18, 1961
    The first general election of the Republic of South Africa is won by the National Party with 105 out of 160 seats, showing a gain of 10% and increasing its parliamentary majority by two seats.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau
    •  Muller, C.F.J. (ed) (1981). Five Hundred years: a history of South Africa; 3rd rev. ed., Pretoria: Academica, p. 510

  • Saturday, October 18, 1958
    Premier Ahmadou Ahidjo discloses that France had agreed to grant the Cameroons internal autonomy and, if supported by a referendum, independence by Jan. 1, 1960.
    References:

  • Thursday, October 18, 1956
    Dr Stanley Makhosi Bhebhe, SA theologian and sociologist, is born.
    References:
    • Hayes, S. (ed) (2000).  Who's Who of Southern Africa 2001 ..., Graighall: Jonathan Ball.

  • Saturday, October 18, 1952
    Eleven protestors are killed in an event arising from a defiance campaign.
    References:
    • Coleman, M. (ed) (1998). A Crime Against Humanity: analysing the repression of the apartheid state, Johannesburg: Human Rights Committee.

  • Friday, October 18, 1946
    The Special Service Battalion of the defence force of the Union of South Africa is dissolved, and gymnasiums for the army, air force and navy established.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Thursday, October 18, 1934
    Prof. Willem Blommaert (48), SA historian, dies in Stellenbosch.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Friday, October 18, 1929
    Herbert Hayton Castens, first SA rugby captain and also captain of the first SA cricket team to tour overseas, dies in London.
    References:
    • Sonderling, N.E. (ed.) (1999). New Dictionary of South African Biography, v.2, Pretoria: Vista.

  • Friday, October 18, 1929
    General J.B.M. Hertzog rebukes National Party secessionists at a party congress in Bloemfontein.
    References:

  • Saturday, October 18, 1913
    Dinuzulu ka-Cetewayo, Zulu chief, released from prison by Gen. Louis Botha (who also saw to it that he received a farm to live on), dies on his farm Uitkyk in Middelburg district, Eastern Transvaal.
    References:
    • Potgieter, D.J. et al. (eds) (1970). Standard Encyclopaedia of Southern Africa, Cape Town: NASOU, v. 4, p. 43
    •  Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Friday, October 18, 1912
    Turkish Sultan cedes Libya to Italy under a treaty signed at Ouchy, Switzerland.
  • Thursday, October 18, 1888
    Ernst Berthold Grosskopf, SA journalist and author, is born in Bloemfontein.
    References:
    • Swart, M.J., et al. (eds) (1980). Afrikaanse Kultuuralmanak, Aucklandpark: Federasie van Afrikaanse Kultuurvereniginge
    •  Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Wednesday, October 18, 1899
    Anglo-Boer War:  In a proclamation sent to Basutoland, President Steyn explains the defensive presence of commandos on the Basutoland border and stresses that the OFS is at peace with the Basuto.
    References:
    • Cloete, P.G. (2000). The Anglo-Boer War: a chronology, Pretoria: Lapa.

  • Sunday, October 18, 1885
    Percy Albert Wagner, economic geologist and author of articles on diamonds, iron, tin, platinum and the Bushveld Igneous Complex that earned him international recognition, is born in Richmond, Cape Colony.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau
    •  Potgieter, D.J. et al. (eds) (1970). Standard Encyclopaedia of Southern Africa, Cape Town: NASOU, v.11, p. 307.

  • Friday, October 18, 1872
    Mpande, king of the Zulu people and half-brother of Dingane, dies in Zululand. Another source gives the date as 19 November 1872.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau
    •  https://www.news24.com
    •  Potgieter, D.J. et al. (eds) (1970). Standard Encyclopaedia of Southern Africa, Cape Town: NASOU, v. 7, p. 626.

  • Saturday, October 18, 1687
    The first church building in Stellenbosch, erected at request of Governor Simon van der Stel, is consecrated.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau
    •  Swart, M.J., et al. (eds) (1980). Afrikaanse Kultuuralmanak Aucklandpark: Federasie van Afrikaanse Kultuurvereniginge.

  • Saturday, October 18, 1653
    Abraham, son of Jan van Riebeeck, is born.  He is the second White baby to be born in the fort De Goede Hoop at the Cape.
    References:
    • Swart, M.J., et al. (eds) (1980). Afrikaanse Kultuuralmanak, Aucklandpark: Federasie van Afrikaanse Kultuurvereniginge
    •  Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau