This Day in History

 25 April →
Wednesday, April 25, 1804
222

The town of Uitenhage in the Eastern Cape Province was founded when then Commissioner-General Jacob Uitenhage de Mist felt there was a need to improve the colonial administration of the Cape areas. The new district of Uitenhage was then founded and was named after de Mist.

This article was produced by South African History Online on 19-Apr-2013

This Day in History Extra Dates
  • Sunday, April 25, 2004
    Pres. Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe, arriving in Pretoria for the 10th anniversary of a free South Africa and the inauguration of Pres. Thabo Mbeki, is housed in a guesthouse after 2 5-star hotels refused to accommodate him.
    References:
    • SABC. News Bulletin

  • Tuesday, April 25, 2000
    Heads of State or their senior representatives from 44 African countries gather in Abuja, Nigeria to deliberate on the problem of malaria and sign the Abuja Declaration that commit their countries to reaching specific targets on malaria prevention and control by 2005.
  • Saturday, April 25, 1998
    Millions of Nigerians boycott legislative elections billed by the ruling junta as a first step toward democracy.
    References:

  • Thursday, April 25, 1996
    Senior members of the Zulu royal family are attacked in a royal residence near Durban.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Thursday, April 25, 1996
    Parties table more than 300 amendments to the constitutional legislation. The National Party (NP) fight for the insertion of a right of lockout as a counter to labour's right to strike and provision for single-language education. The Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) calls for a one-day general strike on 30 April 1996 to demonstrate opposition to a lockout clause. The ANC is criticised for supporting this call. Both the ANC and the NP are criticised for negotiating in private.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Monday, April 25, 1994
    Ten commuters are killed in a bomb explosion at a taxi rank in Germiston. The 'Blanke Bevrydings-beweging'  (BBB) accepts responsibility.
    References:
    • Coleman, M. (ed)(1998). A Crime Against Humanity: analysing the repression of the apartheid state, Johannesburg: Human Rights Committee, p. 267.

  • Monday, April 25, 1994
    The Japanese Government donates US$4 million to the United Nations Observer Mission in South Africa (UNOMSA), through the Trust Fund in Support of United Nations Peace-making and Peacekeeping activities.

  • Monday, April 25, 1994
    The beginning of a bombing campaign marks last day of White rule in South Africa.
  • Saturday, April 25, 1992
    Barend du Plessis, the Minister of Finance, resigns because of ill health.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Sunday, April 25, 2004
    Pres. Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe, arriving in Pretoria for the 10th anniversary of a free South Africa and the inauguration of Pres. Thabo Mbeki, is housed in a guesthouse after 2 5-star hotels refused to accommodate him.
    References:
    • SABC. News Bulletin

  • Tuesday, April 25, 2000
    Heads of State or their senior representatives from 44 African countries gather in Abuja, Nigeria to deliberate on the problem of malaria and sign the Abuja Declaration that commit their countries to reaching specific targets on malaria prevention and control by 2005.
  • Saturday, April 25, 1998
    Millions of Nigerians boycott legislative elections billed by the ruling junta as a first step toward democracy.
    References:

  • Thursday, April 25, 1996
    Senior members of the Zulu royal family are attacked in a royal residence near Durban.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Thursday, April 25, 1996
    Parties table more than 300 amendments to the constitutional legislation. The National Party (NP) fight for the insertion of a right of lockout as a counter to labour's right to strike and provision for single-language education. The Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) calls for a one-day general strike on 30 April 1996 to demonstrate opposition to a lockout clause. The ANC is criticised for supporting this call. Both the ANC and the NP are criticised for negotiating in private.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Monday, April 25, 1994
    Ten commuters are killed in a bomb explosion at a taxi rank in Germiston. The 'Blanke Bevrydings-beweging'  (BBB) accepts responsibility.
    References:
    • Coleman, M. (ed)(1998). A Crime Against Humanity: analysing the repression of the apartheid state, Johannesburg: Human Rights Committee, p. 267.

  • Monday, April 25, 1994
    The Japanese Government donates US$4 million to the United Nations Observer Mission in South Africa (UNOMSA), through the Trust Fund in Support of United Nations Peace-making and Peacekeeping activities.

  • Monday, April 25, 1994
    The beginning of a bombing campaign marks last day of White rule in South Africa.
  • Saturday, April 25, 1992
    Barend du Plessis, the Minister of Finance, resigns because of ill health.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Wednesday, April 25, 1990
    Testifying before the Harms Commission, which was taking testimony at the South African Embassy in London, former police captain Dirk Coetzee, now a member of the ANC, says that he oversaw the 1981 killing by the secret police of Black activist Sizwe Kindile and of the human rights lawyer Griffiths Mxenge.

  • Monday, April 25, 1988
    South Africa says it has accepted a Western plan aimed at preparing Southwest Africa, now Namibia, for independence under Black majority rule.
    References:

  • Friday, April 25, 1986
    Two hundred Libyan students are deported from Britain.
  • Friday, April 25, 1986
    Rioting breaks out across Soweto, South Africa's largest Black township, following police blockade of youths protesting arrest of fifteen students.
    References:

  • Friday, April 25, 1986
    Mswati III becomes King of Swaziland.
    References:
    • Bute & Harmer: The Black Handbook
    •  https://www.state.gov/

  • Sunday, April 25, 1982
    Israel turns over the final third of the occupied Sinai Peninsula to Egypt under the Camp David peace agreement.
  • Wednesday, April 25, 1979
    John Stephen Gomas, trade unionist and political activist, dies in Cape Town.
    References:
    • Verwey, E.J. (ed)(1995). New Dictionary of South African Biography, v.1, Pretoria: HSRC.

  • Monday, April 25, 1977
    The government for the first time allows twenty local journalists, five correspondents of international news agencies and two official photographers to visit the prison on Robben Island, where 370 men convicted under security legislation are held. The material conditions are considered in general to be satisfactory, but the lack of contact with the outside world is very severe.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Monday, April 25, 1977
    The Chief of Staff (Operations) says that the development of South Africa's defence has made the country completely self-sufficient from an arms point of view.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Tuesday, April 25, 1967
    Britain grants internal self-government to Swaziland.
  • Thursday, April 25, 1963
    Hendrik Susan, violist and leader of a 'Boeremusiek-orkes' dies.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Thursday, April 25, 1963
    Paul Ramotsoane Mosaka (born c. 1911), politician and founder of the African Democratic Party (ADP) and also an influential and notorious businessman, dies in Manzini, Swaziland.
    References:
    • Verwey, E.J. (ed)(1995). New Dictionary of South African Biography, v.1, Pretoria: HSRC.

  • Tuesday, April 25, 1961
    Fourth nuclear bomb test by France in the Sahara.
  • Friday, April 25, 1941
    General Erwin Rommel's Deutsches Afrika Korps forces the British out of Halfaya Pass, just southeast of Sollum, and back to the Buq Buq–Sofafi line in Egypt.
  • Wednesday, April 25, 1945
    Delegates of forty-five nations meet in San Francisco, California, to organise the United Nations.
    References:

  • Tuesday, April 25, 1905
    A new constitution is given to the former Boer republic of Transvaal.
  • Friday, April 25, 1902
    Anglo-Boer War 2: General Jan Christiaan Smuts surrenders to the British under a flag of truce. Deneys Reitz who agrees to act as Smuts' orderly joins him. However, on discovering that orderlies are not treated as officers, Reitz is instantly promoted to chief-of-staff.
  • Wednesday, April 25, 1900
    Anglo-Boer War 2: Relief of Jammersberg Drift: The relief columns under Generals Hart and Barbazon arrive at Wepener. General De Wet returns to his primary goal of disrupting British supply lines.
  • Sunday, April 25, 1880
    Cornelis Moll (65), publisher of the first newspaper in Natal, dies in Nylstroom.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Monday, April 25, 1859
    Building starts on the Suez Canal under the engineer and designer Ferdinand de Lisseps (or Lesseps).
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau
    •  https://www.sis.gov.eg/

  • Wednesday, April 25, 1804
    The district of Uitenhage is formed in the eastern Cape and named after Jacob Abraham Uitenhage de Mist.
    References:
    • Potgieter, D.J. et al. (eds)(1970). Standard Encyclopaedia of Southern Africa, Cape Town: NASOU, v. 11, p. 49
    •  Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Saturday, April 25, 1801
    Frederick Logier, German music teacher at the Cape and composer of the first published music in Cape Town, is born in Ireland.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Saturday, April 25, 1722
    Olof Martin(i) Bergh, secretary of the Political Council and acting fiscal and auctioneer, is born in Cape Town.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Wednesday, April 25, 2012
    Africa Malaria Day is celebrated yearly.
    References:

  • Monday, April 25, 1988
    South Africa says it has accepted a Western plan aimed at preparing Southwest Africa, now Namibia, for independence under Black majority rule.
    References:

  • Wednesday, April 25, 1990
    Testifying before the Harms Commission, which was taking testimony at the South African Embassy in London, former police captain Dirk Coetzee, now a member of the ANC, says that he oversaw the 1981 killing by the secret police of Black activist Sizwe Kindile and of the human rights lawyer Griffiths Mxenge.

  • Friday, April 25, 1986
    Rioting breaks out across Soweto, South Africa's largest Black township, following police blockade of youths protesting arrest of fifteen students.
    References:

  • Friday, April 25, 1986
    Two hundred Libyan students are deported from Britain.
  • Sunday, April 25, 1982
    Israel turns over the final third of the occupied Sinai Peninsula to Egypt under the Camp David peace agreement.
  • Wednesday, April 25, 1979
    John Stephen Gomas, trade unionist and political activist, dies in Cape Town.
    References:
    • Verwey, E.J. (ed)(1995). New Dictionary of South African Biography, v.1, Pretoria: HSRC.

  • Monday, April 25, 1977
    The government for the first time allows twenty local journalists, five correspondents of international news agencies and two official photographers to visit the prison on Robben Island, where 370 men convicted under security legislation are held. The material conditions are considered in general to be satisfactory, but the lack of contact with the outside world is very severe.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Monday, April 25, 1977
    The Chief of Staff (Operations) says that the development of South Africa's defence has made the country completely self-sufficient from an arms point of view.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood.

  • Tuesday, April 25, 1967
    Britain grants internal self-government to Swaziland.
  • Thursday, April 25, 1963
    Hendrik Susan, violist and leader of a 'Boeremusiek-orkes' dies.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Thursday, April 25, 1963
    Paul Ramotsoane Mosaka (born c. 1911), politician and founder of the African Democratic Party (ADP) and also an influential and notorious businessman, dies in Manzini, Swaziland.
    References:
    • Verwey, E.J. (ed)(1995). New Dictionary of South African Biography, v.1, Pretoria: HSRC.

  • Tuesday, April 25, 1961
    Fourth nuclear bomb test by France in the Sahara.
  • Wednesday, April 25, 1945
    Delegates of forty-five nations meet in San Francisco, California, to organise the United Nations.
    References:

  • Friday, April 25, 1941
    General Erwin Rommel's Deutsches Afrika Korps forces the British out of Halfaya Pass, just southeast of Sollum, and back to the Buq Buq–Sofafi line in Egypt.
  • Tuesday, April 25, 1905
    A new constitution is given to the former Boer republic of Transvaal.
  • Friday, April 25, 1902
    Anglo-Boer War 2: General Jan Christiaan Smuts surrenders to the British under a flag of truce. Deneys Reitz who agrees to act as Smuts' orderly joins him. However, on discovering that orderlies are not treated as officers, Reitz is instantly promoted to chief-of-staff.
  • Monday, April 25, 1859
    Building starts on the Suez Canal under the engineer and designer Ferdinand de Lisseps (or Lesseps).
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau
    •  https://www.sis.gov.eg/

  • Sunday, April 25, 1880
    Cornelis Moll (65), publisher of the first newspaper in Natal, dies in Nylstroom.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Wednesday, April 25, 1900
    Anglo-Boer War 2: Relief of Jammersberg Drift: The relief columns under Generals Hart and Barbazon arrive at Wepener. General De Wet returns to his primary goal of disrupting British supply lines.
  • Saturday, April 25, 1801
    Frederick Logier, German music teacher at the Cape and composer of the first published music in Cape Town, is born in Ireland.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Saturday, April 25, 1722
    Olof Martin(i) Bergh, secretary of the Political Council and acting fiscal and auctioneer, is born in Cape Town.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau