Mission Stations - I-L

Mission Stations - I

IBISI, Natal: FMA; WMMS
ICQUIBIGHA, Cape: see IGQIBIGHA, Middledrift, Cape
IDUTYWA, also known as IDUTYWA RESERVE, Cape: UFS 1880; SAfMS 1883; ECS 1896; WMS
IFAFA, Natal: ABCFM 1848
IFUMI, Natal: ABCFM 1837
IGGI BIGHA, Cape: see IGQIBIGHA, Cape
IGQIBIGHA, also spelt IGGI BIGHA and IQUBEKA, Middledrift, Cape: GMS 1837; UPC 1847; Station destroyed 1850
IKWEZI LAMACHI, Natal: IL 1877
IMBAZANE RIVER, Natal: HF 1909
IMFULE, Natal: NMS 1865
IMMIGRANT LOCATION, Stutterheim, Cape: see ST JOHNS, Stutterheim, Cape
IMPOLWENI, Pietermaritzburg, Natal: FCS c1867; UFS 1872
IMPUSHENI, Natal: ABCFM
IMVANI, Queenstown, Cape: WMMS 1846; ECS 1854
INANDA, Natal: ABCFM 1837
INCHERA, also known as OLD LOVEDALE, Cape: GMS 1824; UFS 1844
INDALENI, Natal: SAfMS 1847; WMS 1848
INDAWANA, Cape: see ENSIKENI, Cape
INDIAN MISSION, Natal: WMS
INDUNDUMA, Natal: ABCFM
INDWE, also known as GUBA, Cape: DRCSA 1901; Bn
INGWAVUMA, Natal: SPG 1897; SAfMS
INHAMAXAFO, Mocambique: see INYARIME, Mocambique
INHAMBANE, also known as MABILI, Mocambique: FMA 1885; ABCFM pre-1891; SPG 1894
INHLASATYE, also spelt INHLAZATYE, Natal: NMS 1862
INHLWATI, Natal: SPG
INKANYEZI, assumed to have been located near Mpande's capital, it was abandoned after two years, Natal: ABCFM 1840
INTONGAZI, also spelt ITONGASI, Cape: HG 1909
INTONGAZI, also spelt INTONGASI, Natal: HF 1909
INYARIME, also known as INHAMAXAFO, Mocambique: FMA 1921
INYATI, Botswana, but may have been in Zimbabwe: LMS 1860
INYATI, Zimbabwe, but may have been in Botswana: LMS 1860
INYAZURA, Zimbabwe: SDA 1910
INYEZANE, Natal: HM
IPOLELA, also spelt POLELA, Natal: UFS 1905; SPG
IQHIBIRHA, also spelt IGQUIBIGHA, QHIBIRHA, QIBIRA or QUIBEGHA, Middledrift, Cape: UPCM; GMS. May also have been known as the PROSPECT mission. It was visited by James Backhouse in February 1839 (p 226), who recorded it as follows:

"We met a kind reception from Robert Niven, who was residing alone, in a stone house consisting of a few plain rooms, one of which was used for a school. There were a few (Xhosa) huts near his dwelling, and fifteen kraals within six miles.
"At sunrise, a congregation of about eighteen (Xhosa) and (Khoikhoi), assembled in the temporary chapel, a large, beehive hut, neatly seated with wicker forms, in concentric circles, and with a projection from the interior base of the wall, covered with cow-dung and clay. A little pulpit and reading-desk, neatly covered with printed-cotton, were opposite to the door, which was also of wickerwork".

IQUBEKA, Cape: see IGQIBIGHA, Cape
ISANDHLWANA, Natal: SPG 1880
ISHINGEWEKWE, Mocambique: SAGM
ISINYAMBUSI, also known as ESINYAMBOTI, Natal: NMS 1886
ISLAMBIE'S TRIBE, Cape: see WESTLEYVILLE, Cape
ITAFUMASI, Natal: ABCFM 1851
ITAKA, Natal: HM
ITEMBA, Cape: Bn. It was visited by James Backhouse in February 1839 (p 242), who recorded the following:

"Itemba is on the south side of the Kabousi, among Umhala's Caffers. The Missionary Julius Schuldheis, and his assistant, were at this time occupied in erecting a house; they were living in poor Caffer huts: the assistant was suffering severely from rheumatism, which had been greatly aggravated by working, on his hands and knees, among wet clay, in making bricks; they were both single men".

ITEMBA, district of Alfred, Natal: FMA 1900
ITEMBA, lower Tugela, Natal: FBS 1895
ITEMBENI, also spelt ETEMBENI, Natal: HM 1856
ITOKOZO, Transvaal: SACIM
IXOPO, Natal: see STUARTSTOWN
IZALA, Cape: see PALMERTON, Cape
IZELE, King William's Town, Cape: No data available

Mission Stations - J

JACOBSKAPELLE, Cape: MorG
JACOBUS KORANNA, OFS: Bn
JAGERSFONTEIN, OFS: DRCSAO 1896; SAfMS; WMS
JALAMBU, Natal: see HALAMBU, Natal
JENA, Zimbabwe: DRCSA
JENCA, Tsolo, Cape: No data available
JERICHO, also spelt JERICO, Transvaal: HM 1879
JERUSALEM, Namibia: see AFRIKANER'S KRAAL, Namibia
JICHIDZA, Zimbabwe: DRCSA 1902
JIXINI, Mqanduli, Cape: No data available
JOHANNESBURG, Transvaal: SPG 1887; ABCFM 1887; Bn 1887; SKM 1902; MSR 1904; BFBS 1905
JONONAS KOP, Natal: WMS

Mission Stations - K

KADITSHWENE, also spelt KURICHANE and KURRACHANE, Transvaal: HM; LMS
KAFFIR INSTITUTION, Cape: see TRAINING SCHOOL, Grahamstown, Cape
KALABASI, also spelt KALIBASI, Natal: UFS 1896
KALIMBEZA, Namibia: SDA 1921
KALK BAY, Cape: DRCSA
KALKFONTEIN, Cape: RM
KALO, also spelt KOLO, Lesotho: P 1901
KAMA, Cape: see MIDDLEDRIFT, Cape
KAMASTONE, Queenstown, Cape: LMS 1820-1848; WMS 1849; SAfMS
KAMA'S TRIBE, Cape: WMS 1848
KAMBE, also spelt EKAMBE or EKOMBE, Natal: NMS 1880
KAMBINI, Mocambique: ABCFM pre-1891; MEFB 1907
KAMBULA, Natal: SPG
KAMIESBERG, also known as LILY FONTEIN, Cape: LMS 1802-1820; SAfMS 1816; WMS. It was visited by James Backhouse in January 1840 who made the following report:

"The Mission village of Lily Fountain, which is represented in the accompanying cut, takes its name from the growth of "Zantideschia ethiopica", the Lily of the Nile, in the spring at this place: it consists of a plain, substantial Mission-house, and some other buildings, used as a school-house and stores; also a chapel, standing at a distance from these, as well as some cattle-kraals, and a considerable number of mat- huts. The first house erected here, was built by Barnabas Shaw, the first Missionary at this station, who also made the first plough used here, and first taught the Hottentots of the Kamiesberg to cultivate the soil".

KANA, Transvaal: see CANA, Transvaal
KANGELANI, Natal: NMS 1914
KANYE, also spelt KANYA, Botswana: LMS 1871; SDA
KARIBIB, also spelt KHARIBIB, Namibia: RM 1902
KARKLOOF, Natal: MMAN 1867; SPG
KAT RIVER SETTLEMENT, Cape: LMS 1829. It was visited by James Backhouse in January 1839 (p 189), who recorded the following:

"The Kat River country is the finest in the Cape Colony: it owes its fertility and beauty to a lofty range of basaltic mountains of picturesque outline. They are crested with crags, and are grassy on their irregular slopes, and wooded in their kloofs, from whence issue streamlets that irrigate the valleys. These are well cropped with Meelies or Indian Corn, (Maize), and Potatoes, and are interspersed with little villages, formed of the rude, beehive-shaped, grass-huts of the Fingoes, the house-shaped ones of the poorer (Khoikhoi), and the neat cottages of those who have become more prosperous. Some of the last would not discredit the more respectable of the labouring class in England. The walls are of brick, externally, of that which has een burnt, and internally, of such as is only sun-dried: they are plastered on both sides with mud, and are whitewashed internally. The roofs are thatched with reeds, and Vines trained on poles, form verandas to some of them.
"In a few of the villages, school-houses have been erected by the (Khoikhoi), which are fitted up on the plan of the British and Foreign School Society. Some of these schools are supported by the benevolence of private individuals in England, and the (Khoikhoi) contribute to the support of the others. These school-houses, or in villages where there are none of these, other houses, are occupied as places of worship, in which some of the elders of the Kat River church generally conduct the services".

KATZENBERG, Cape: MorG
KAYSER'S, Cape: see KNAPP'S HOPE, Middledrift, Cape
KCHALATLOLU, Transvaal: No data available. Alexander Merensky reported as follows:

"The location for our new mission station, Kchalatlolu, lies at the foot of the Kchalatlolu mountains, next to the Sebeloane river. We proceeded to build a water piping system, followed by a log house eight steps long and four steps wide, similar to the one in Gerlachshoop. It had a window, covered with sack cloth, and a door, which was closed at night with mats. Our labourers worked six weeks for a cotton blanket, two to three weeks for a hoe. Boys and girls received a few beads or some brass wire as wages".
"We began to build a larger house for our missionary in Kchalatlolu. Andries Moloi, the translator, knew how to make sun-dried bricks and 13,000 were manufactured. Poles for the rafters and beams were bought from the natives and planks from chests (in which donations for the mission station were sent from Berlin) were used for window frames and for the shutters. These were in two sections, having a top and bottom part. The roof was thatched and the floor made from smeared clay; the house was then white washed inside and out. It had three rooms: the centre one was used as the main working and living room, those on its left and right were the sleeping quarters for my helper and I. All three windows had a covering of cloth, no glass being available, and the main entrance had a stable door. The bedrooms were closed off with a curtain". "The side chamber in our little house in Kchalatlolu was now used as a church".
"In 1864 the only house in Kchalatlolu had three rooms, the middle one measuring 12 by 12 feet; cooking being done outside. There was also a cattle kraal and a goat enclosure".

KEETSMANSHOOP, Namibia: RM 1866; SAfMS 1914
KEILANDS, Stutterheim, Cape: No data available
KEISKAMMAHOEK, Cape: LMS 1837; WMS; DGT
KENHART, Cape: DRCSA 1872
KENILWORTH, Cape: SDA 1887
KENTANI LOCATION, also known as MISSION LOCATION, Cape: No data available
KESTELL, OFS: DRCSAO 1907
KEVELAER, Natal: Rc
KHALATLOLU, Transvaal: Bn 1861
KHALOSI, Lesotho: SPG 1897
KHAMBI, Umtata, Cape: No data available
KHOBONQABA, Kentani, Cape: see COLUMBA, Kentani, Cape
KHORHO, Lady Grey, Cape: No data available
KICHERER, also known as BLIJDE VOORUITZICHTSFONTEIN and SAK RIVER, Cape: LMS 1799. It was visited by Henry Lichtenstein in 1805 when he reported as follows:

"Supported by the missionary societies in England, which are tolerably wealthy, he came hither with a large stock of sheep and cattle, and collected about him a considerable number of Hottentots, and even of (San), whom he promised to maintain, provided they would receive and follow the doctrines he should teach them. He built a sort of church, near which the savages constructed their huts,* and they assembled daily for the worship of God, and to hear him preach the gospel to them; but without his ever thinking of paying attention to forming their minds and manners in any other way. He, as well as Van-der-Kemp, seemed wholly to forget that mankind were destined to work as well as to pray. Besides, these savages were taught to pray in a language of which they understood not a word: their instructor thought it sufficient for them to learn the prayers by heart, hoping that thus they would learn the language, and then understand the prayers, how mystical soever they might be.
The plate here given represents the missionary Institutions above described. Among the houses to the left, the largest is the Church, as it is called, the habitation of the missionary; round about are the huts of the Hottentots. Somewhat to enliven the scene, cattle and goats are introduced, but the fact is, that the spot is entirely destitute of food for these animals. Though the soil in the pass is mentioned as being fertilized by a spring which flows from the rocks, that effect ceases close to the house, and the whole plain is naked and barren.
"This church is really scarcely any thing more than a little barn, for it consists of nothing but the walls, and a roof, without any divisions or fitting up within. To the left of the entrance is a sort of pulpit, built of stone, whence the preacher gives his instructions, and in face of it are half a dozen benches for his auditors. There is not the slightest trace of an altar, a cross, a picture, or any other symbol of Christianity. Instead of these, in the dark back ground of the building, is a bed, a table, a couple of stools, with leather thongs over them for the seats, and a couple of old chests: these constitute the whole household furniture of the pastor. A piece of parchment scraped fine, and stretched over a hole in the wall, serves as a window: this is not substantial enough to keep out the cold air, and not transparent enough properly to admit the light : the building is about forty feet long and seventeen broad. Near it stand six or eight pandokken, as they are called, a kind of huts made of reeds woven into a wooden frame, which are inhabited by the principal Bastard-Hottentots: the poorer have little low huts in the form of a hemisphere, which consist of a skeleton of wood, with a mat drawn over it.

KIMBERLEY, also known as DIAMOND FIELDS, Cape: SAfMS 1870; Bn 1875; SAG 1881; DRCSA 1888; WMS
KING WILLIAM'S TOWN, Cape: LMS 1825; CUSA 1826; WMS 1849; NBC 1900; SPG
KIRKWOOD, Glen Grey, Cape: GAMS 1841; UPC 1847; WMS 1848
KLAARWATER, Cape: see GRIQUATOWN, Cape
KLAVANI, Mocambique: SPG 1900
KLEIN WINDHOEK, Namibia: Rc 1899
KLERKSDORP, Transvaal: SPG 1897; WMMS
KLIPDAM, Cape: SAfMS 1907
KLIPDAM, Transvaal: NBC
KLIPDRIFT, Kimberley, Cape: SPG 1870
KLIPFONTEIN, Cape: see BETHANY, Cape
KNAPP'S HOPE, Middledrift, Cape, on the Keiskamma River: LMS 1833; CUSA 1836. Changed to KEISKAMA (KNAPSHOPE) in 1837. It was visited by James Backhouse in February 1839 who recorded the following:

"The mission-house at Knaps Hope was a small, thatched, wattle and dab cottage. The Missionary and his wife, who had five children, entertained strangers hospitably in this humble dwelling, but their own health suffered from the closeness of the place in hot weather, and from the draft to which they were exposed, when obliged to set open the doors, and the shutters which supplied the place of windows".

KNOX, Middledrift, Cape: No data available
KNYSNA, Cape: DRCSA 1903; SPG
KOBA MISSION STATION, near Thaba 'Nchu, OFS: Probable PMS. Visited by Arbousset and Daumas in 1836, who recorded the following:

"About a thousand huts made of marsh reeds, and each protected by a railing before it, compose the station. They are dispersed over two large parallel hills, which are separated from each other by a stream of water. Near the top, and looking down upon the town, stand the church and parsonage, also two small buildings, one of which contains a printing press, and the other the forge belonging to the station. It is peopled chiefly by Barolongs, who came in 1834 from the north-west, and submitted to a young chief of an amiable disposition, called Moroko. There are also some Baharutsis to be found there, who are subject to an old morena, who was ruined by Moselekatsi, in whose neighbourhood he formerly lived."

KOBONGABA, Cape: see COLUMBA, Kentani, Cape
KOENENG, Lesotho: P 1899
KOENIGSBERG, Natal: Bn 1866
KOKFONTEIN, also known as KOK FOUNTAIN, Namaqualand: No data available. It was visited by James Backhouse in January 1840, who recorded the following:

"Their dwelling, which is represented in the accompanying cut, consisted of a house of two rooms, and two mat huts. There were also at this place a rude cottage belonging to an absent trader, and seven mat huts belonging to the people. Most of the persons connected with this station, lived in the surrounding country".

 

Later on, in February 1840, he also had this to say:

"Michael Wimmer constantly left Kok Fontein in the winter; he packed up three mat-huts, which then served as a dwelling, a chapel, and a kitchen, and removed with his wagon and cart, to the places where most of the people were sojourning".

KOKSBOSCH, Humansdorp, Cape: CLARKSON, Humansdorp, Cape
KOKSTAD, Cape: SPG 1877; SAfMS 1880; WMS
KOLO, Lesotho: see KALO, Lesotho
KOLOBENG, Botswana, but may have been in Transvaal: LMS
KOLOBENG, Transvaal: HM
KOLWENI, Matatiele, Cape: No data available
KOMAGGAS, Cape: RM 1840; LMS. It was visited by James Backhouse in January 1840, who recorded it as follows:

"At length we reached the foot of the hills, and arrived at Komaggas, which is represented in the accompanying cut, where a few cottages and mat huts, a little windmill, and some gardens, watered by a copious spring, gave an interest to the scene, of no common kind, in this wilderness.
"The buildings here were of rough stone, and plastered; the chapel was seated with benches of mason-work, plastered and whitewashed, wood being too scarce to be applied for this purpose; none was to be had nearer than the Orange River, except from a few Kameeldoorns, some of which had been sacrificed for making a neat pulpit, which was the work of a brother-in-law of the Missionary. Three of the people had cottages; the rest occupied mat-huts; of these there were only thirteen on the station; sometimes there were more than thirty, and about 400 people, and from seventy to 110 children in the school".

KOMATIE, Leydenburg, Transvaal: MC
KONFELD, Cape: Bn
KONGENI, Umtata, Cape: No data available
KONIGSBERG, Cape: Bn
KONKORDIA, Cape: see CONCORDIA MINE, Cape
KOPJES KASTEEL, Cape: MorG
KORAB, Namibia: RM
KOSI BAY, Natal: see KOSI RIVER, Natal
KOSI RIVER, also known as KOSI BAY and THRELFALL MISSION, Natal: SAfMS
KOUROULENE, also spelt KURULEN, Transvaal: MSR 1905
KRAMERSFONTEIN, Cape: LMS
KRANSPOORT, Zoutpansberg, Transvaal: No data available
KRATZENSTEIN, Transvaal: see MPHOME, Transvaal
KREUZBURG, also known as MAKOHABENG and MAKOTOPONG, Transvaal: Bn 1899
KROONDAL, Transvaal: HM 1890
KROONSTAD, OFS: SPG 1864; SAfMS 1874; WMS
KRUGERSDORP, Transvaal: DRCSAT 1905; HM 1911; PH; WMMS
KRUISFONTEIN, Humansdorp, Cape: CUSA 1856
KRUIS RIVER, also known as DE RUST, Cape: DRCSA 1904
KUBIKATYE, Glen Grey, Cape: No data available
KUEBUNG, also spelt KUEBONG, Mount Fletcher, Cape: No data available
KURICHANE, Transvaal: see KADITSHWENE, Transvaal
KURRACHANE, Transvaal: see KADITSHWENE, Transvaal
KURULEN, Transvaal: see KOUROULENE, Transvaal
KURUMAN, also known as NEW LATTAKOO, Cape: LMS 1818. It was visited by John Campbell in March 1820, when it was still being referred to as New Lattakoo. He reported that:

"We found a commodious place of worship had been erected, capable of containing about four hundred persons; and also a long row of Missionary houses, furnished with excellent gardens behind. In front of the houses, a neat fence composed of reeds has been constructed, which improves the general appearance. We names the whole buildings attached to the Mission Burder's Row, after the Rev George Burder, Secretary to the Missionary Society.
"The Missionaries, with the few Hottentots attached to the mission, have dug a canal from a distance of three miles above the town, by means of which the whole water of the Krooman is led into the extensive fields and gardens. I went to view this useful work after breakfast, and found extensive fields of (maize), belonging to the natives on both sides of the canal. Similar cultivation extends two miles higher up the river in the same direction. Though the Krooman be emptied by the canal, it soon becomes larger than before, in consequence of twelve or fourteen fountains issuing from the ground, about a quarter of a mile lower down than the dam, and which discharge nearly en equal quantity of water at all seasons of the year".

John Burrow, who accompanied the Smith expedition in 1835, had this to say about the Station:

"The native town which lies at the back of the Missionaries' is very large, and since the breaking up of Old Lattakoo considerably augmented since Mateebe left this. His eldest son has, I believe, been considered as the Chief although Mahura, Mateebe's brother, living at Old Lattakoo, transacted all business. I went one evening to see what they call a reed dance, which they always hold by moonlight, and first on arriving at the cattle kraal where it was held, I could neither make head nor tail of it. But on looking more attentively I saw in one part a number of people blowing with all their might into reeds of different lengths, making a most horrible, and at the same time ludicrous, noise. In the middle were a number of men dancing, or rather jumping, stamping, sweating and making fools of themselves, while the women ran round them, clapping their hands and hollowing like so many mad creatures. Walking round to the opposite side to get a better view of them I was astonished to see some of our people who, not seeing me, were enjoying the fun as much as the Bechuanas themselves".

Burrow was followed four years later by James Backhouse who, in September 1839, recorded it as follows:

"The Kuruman Missionary Station, which is sometimes called New Lattakoo, is situated by the side of the Kuruman River, a clear, permanent stream, which rises at the Little Kuruman, disappears at intervals, a few miles further from its source, and at length is only marked by a dry water course, except in rainy weather. At the Missionary Station, the back of which, is represented in the accompanying etching, its margin is planted with willows, and its waters are employed in irrigating some fertile gardens and corn-lands; below these, there is a piece of marshy ground, on which rice has sometimes been grown. The houses of the Missionaries, which are plain dwellings, in rural farm-house style, and the other buildings stand in a line, on the side of the road, opposite to the gardens. They are built of hard, dove-coloured limestone, and thatched. The chapel will holdupwards of 1,000 people. Behind the houses, there are several patches of the low, thorny, "Acacia Lattaku"; among these, the burial-ground is situated; it is marked by a few little piles of stones. Contiguous to the Station, there are several Bechuana villages; others are scattered more remotely on the side of the river, and in the adjacent country. Wood is so scarce, that the timber used for the roof of the chapel was brought from the neighbourhood of Mosega, distant about 200 miles".

John MacKenzie visited Kuruman in 1859 and reported as follows:

"The present station, however, was not commenced till A tract of about two miles of the country was bought by the missionaries from Mothibe, and paid for with articles which Mr Moffat had brought from Cape Town. Here were raised a large and substantial church, and two good dwelling-houses, all of stone. I am about to speak of the higher moral and spiritual structure which has been reared in this district; but having myself made some acquaintance with the house-builder's tools in Africa, I feel bound to mention with respect the solid stone walls and the well-constructed roof of the Kuruman church. The station was laid out by Mr Moffat, who to his services as land-surveyor and architect added with equal diligence the humbler but no less necessary and arduous callings of quarryier of stones and hewer of timber for the church. The walls were built by well-qualified stone-masons, Millen and Hume. The roof was the work of the Rev R Edwards, for more than the years connected with the Kuruman mission, afterwards resident at one of the stations broken up by the Dutchmen of the Transvaal, and now missionary at Port Elizabeth. These buildings were completed in 1839. The Kuruman station is one of those "marks" in the country which would remain to testify to the skill and power as well as Christian perseverance of its founders, were the white men all expelled from the country, and driven back into the sea, according to the dreams of (Black) soothsayers".

KUZE, Tsomo,Cape: No data available
KWAHLABISA, Natal: Sch 1891
KWAMAGWAZA, Natal: ZMD 1886; SPG
KWANYANA, Bizana, Cape: No data available
KWELEGHA RIVER, Cape: GMS 1839, abandoned June 1842
KWENDA, Zimbabwe: WMS
KWEZANA, Cape: GMS
KWEZI, Natal: see NKWEZI, Alfred County, Natal

Mission Stations - L

LABANZI, Bizana, Cape: No data available
LADISMITH, Cape: Bn 1856
LADYBRAND, OFS: FMS 1883; SAfMS
LADY FRERE, Cape: SAfMS 1896; SPG
LADY GREY, Cape: DRCSA 1908; WMS
LADYSMITH, Natal: SPG 1856; SAfMS 1866; WMS c1869
LAING, Nqamakwe, Cape: No data available
LAINGSBURG, Cape: Bn 1884
LALENI, Cofimvaba, Cape: No data available
LAMACI, Natal: see NKWEZI, Alfred County, Natal
LAMPLOUGH, Glen Grey, Cape: No data available
LAMPLOUGH Training Institution for Girls, Butterworth, Cape: see BUTTERWORTH, Cape
LANDLANA, Willowvale, Cape: No data available but may have been LANDWANE, Cape
LANDWANE, Transkei, Cape: No data available
LANGEBOSCH
, Cape: MorG
LANGENI, Transkei, Cape: No data available
LANSDOWNE, also known as SOMKELE, Natal: Ind 1896
LANTSHU'S LOCATION, Ngqeleni, Cape: No data available
LATTAKOO, Cape: see DITHAKONG, Cape
LELIEFONTEIN, Cape: WMS 1816
LELOALANG, Lesotho: see LELOANENG, Lesotho
LELOANENG, also spelt LELOALANG, Lesotho: P 1878; SME Trade School 1879
LEMANA, near Elim, Northern Transvaal: MSR 1906
LEMGO, Natal: HM 1911
LEOFONTEIN, Transvaal: MHLF
LEPORO, Rustenburg, Transvaal: HM
LERIBE, Lesotho: P 1859; SPG 1876; SDA 191O
LESOOANE, also spelt LISCHUANI, OFS: WMMS 1820-1849
LESSEYTON, Queenstown, Cape: WMS 1850; SAfMS Trade School
LETOALENG, Lesotho: P
LETSUNYANE, also spelt LISHUANI, Lesotho: WMS pre-1839; P 1894. It was visited by James Backhouse in July 1839 who recorded the following:

"Lishuani, which is represented in the accompanying cut, consists of a humble Mission-house, belonging to the Wesleyans: it is situated among great rocks, at the foot of a sandstone cliff. Near the Mission-house, there are a few mat-huts, belonging to some Griquas, who removed hither from Old Bootchap, and in the vicinity there are several Basutu villages. In this neighbourhood a few of the people were also residing, who a few years ago, invaded the missionary-station at Lattakoo; they were under a Chief named Tlalela. Not thinking themselves safe in the Zoolu country, to which they returned, they fled into that of Moshesh, who received them peacably, and appointed them this place, where they now cultivate the ground in peace. Being but a short distance from Lishuani, many of them resort thither to listen to the glad tidings of salvation.
"The people were invited to a meeting in the chapel, which is a large, hartebeest house. About seventy assembled, whom we addressed through the medium of T Sephton".

LICHATLONG, Botswana: see LIKATLONG, Botswana
LICHTENBURG, Transvaal: DRCSAT 1898; WMMS
LIEFELDT, King William's Town, Cape: No data available
LIGUBUDWENI, Kentani, Cape: No data available
LIKALAN, Transvaal: HM
LIKATLONG, also known as LICHATLONG, Botswana: LMS 1840. It was visited by Emil Holub in 1873 when he recorded the following:

"In the middle of them was an open space, marked by the ruins of a mission-house that had been burned down some years previously. A short distance from the mission-house stood the church, a long but insignificant-looking edifice, built of unbaked bricks, with a gabled roof covered with dry grass. At the time of my visit there was no missionary there, but the London Missionary Society, in whose district it lies, have since sent out one of their body".

LIKHOELE, Lesotho: P 1886
LILIFONTEIN, also spelt LILY FONTEIN, Kamiesberg, Cape: see KAMIESBERG, Cape
LILY VALE, East London, Cape: No data available
LIMAO, Botswana, but may have been in Transvaal: HM 1864
LIMAO, Marico, Transvaal: HM 1864
LINDLEY, Natal: ABCFM; SAfMS
LINDLEY, OFS: DRCSAO c1907; SAfMS
LINOKANA, also spelt LINOKANO, Transvaal: HM 1859. It was visited by Emil Holub in 1874 who described it as the "Linokana Hollow Mission to the Transvaal Tswana". He also reported as follows:

"In the eastern portion of the valley, our attention was directed to a group of trees near some well-cultivated fields, conspicuous among them being some eucalyptus, two feet in diameter, and certainly not much less than sixty feet high. Beneath their shade stood several houses built in European style. These were the quarters of a missionary, whose instruction and example have had such a beneficial influence upon the Baharutse, that they have become the most thriving agriculturists of all the Transvaal Bechuanas.
"In the fields round the mission-building maize and wheat were growing, and in the gardens adjacent to the dwelling peaches, apricots, pears, figs, oranges, and citrons were thriving admirably, and, together with the vegetables, contributed a welcome addition towards the support of the modest establishment. The little flower-garden revived pleasant recollections by the abundance of old favourites it contained; there were roses, both as standards and climbers, irises, lilacs with their graceful bloom, and carnations with their pleasant fragrance; tulips and hyacinths had been in bloom, but had now gone off".

LITEYANA, also referred to as SECHELE'S TOWN, Botswana: LMS; HM. It was visited by John MacKenzie in 1860 where he gave the following account:

"The German missionaries had not been idle since their arrival. Besides attending to the acquisition of the language, they had built a dwelling-house for themselves and another for the chief.

LITTLE FLOWER, Qumbu, Cape: No data available
LOBETHAL, Transvaal: Bn 1877
LOMBARD'S POST, Bathurst, Cape: No data available
LOTHA, also spelt LOTA, Idutywa, Cape: No data available
LOTLAKANE, Botswana: WMMS. It was visited by John MacKenzie in 1860 who repeated the following account of the missionary residence:

"Helmore, writing in the hut beside which my wagon stood, described those sufferings to a sister of her husband in England - in a letter from which I give the following extracts:-

"I write this in a pretty little hut, 14 feet by 12, built by your brother. The walls are of palmyra wood, and it is thatched with palmyra leaves, so it answers literally to the name we have given it - Palmyra Lodge, and though rough-looking on the outside it forms a delightful shelter from the scorching rays of the sun. I should tell you that it is 'hartebeest' shape, and has a window at each end, with thin calico instead of glass. I only wish I were in a hut of similar description, but of larger dimensions, north of the Zambese, instead of being still 200 miles south of it, with the prospect of another six weeks' journey; but I must be patient, and leave fearing for the future to record the mercies of the past".

LOURDES, Natal: Rc
LOURDES, Umzimkulu, Cape: Rc 1888
LOURENCO MARQUES, Mocambique: MSR 1889; ABCFM pre-1891; SPG; WMMS
LOUWSBURG, Natal: SAM 1909
LOVEDALE, Alice, Cape: GMS 1824; UFS 1825; LMS 1826; UFS 1844; FCS Trade School 1857. Opened in 1824, it was originally sited at INCHERA, which was renamed LOVEDALE in 1826. This mission was burnt down during the 1834-5 war and became known as OLD LOVEDALE. In 1836 it was moved to a site near present-day FORT HARE. In 1837 it was moved to its present site which is believed to have been known previously as BLOCK DRIFT.
LOVEDALE INSTITUTE, Alice, Cape: GMS 21 July 1841
LOVEDALE SEMINARY, Middledrift, Cape: GMS 1841
LOWER ALBANY, Cape: WMS 1840
LOWER CENTULI, Umtata, Cape: No further data available
LOWER CULUNCA, Qumbu, Cape: No data available
LOWER MACIBINI, also spelt MACHIBINI, Glen Grey, Cape: No data available
LOWER MNYOLO, Engcobo, Cape: No data available
LOWER MPHAKO, also spelt LOWER MPAKO, Mqanduli, Cape: No data available
LOWER MVENYANA, Mount Frere, Cape: No data available
LOWER MZENGE, Flagstaff, Cape: No data available
LOWER QUTSA, Tsomo, Cape: see QUTSA, Tsomo, Cape
LOWER RAINY MISSION, Libodi, Cape: No data available
LOWER ROSA, Qumbu, Cape: see ROSA, Qumbu, Cape
LOWER TSITSANA, Mount Fletcher, Cape: No data available
LOWER TUGELA, Natal: WMS
LOWER UMGENI, also spelt LOWER UMGONI, Natal: SPG
LOWER XANGORHA, Transkei, Cape: No data available
LUANYISWENI, Cape: SAGM 1897
LUBALEKO, Mount Ayliff, Cape: No data available
LUCWECWE, Engcobo, Cape: No data available
LUDEKE, Bizana, Cape: SAfMS 1911
LUDERITZ, also known as LUDERITZBUCHT, Namibia: RM 1905
LUDIZA, Willowvale, Cape: No data available
LUDONDOLO, Idutywa, Cape: No data available
LUDUKANA, Transkei, Cape: No data available
LUEWABA, Transkei, Cape: No data available
LUGXOGWA, Transkei, Cape: No data available
LUHEWINI, Engcobo, Cape: No data available
LUJECWENI, Transkei, Cape: No data available
LUKANISWENI, Lusikisiki, Cape: No data available
LUKENI, Libodi, Cape: No data available
LUKOSANA, Willowvale, Cape: No data available
LUMKU, Glen Grey, Cape: No data available
LUNA, Bizana, Cape: No data available
LUNDI, Mount Fletcher, Cape: No data available
LUNDIE, Willowvale, Cape: No data available
LUPONDO, Lusikisiki, Cape: No data available
LUSHINGTON, Seymour, Cape: LMS 1829-1851. This was probably only an outstation.
LUSIKISIKI, Cape: SPG 1899
LUTATENI, Mount Frere, Cape: No data available
LUTUBENI, also spelt LUTEBENI, Mqanduli, Cape: SAGM 1898
LUTULI, Tsomo, Cape: UPCM
LUVUNDU, Willowvale, Cape: No data available
LUZUPU, Lusikisiki, Cape: No data available
LWANDILI, Ngqeleni, Cape: No data available
LYDENBURG, Transvaal: Bn 1866; SPG 1874; DRCSAT 1907

Last updated : 11-May-2016

This article was produced for South African History Online on 01-Apr-2011