SAHO archive

Displaying 27521 - 27540 of 27560
Gandhiji often stressed that satyagraha is not mere jail-going. He warned, during the first satyagraha in South Africa, as early as 1909: "A satyagrahi must be afraid neither of imprisonment...
Author: E. S. Reddy
Introduction The decade of the 1950s was a decade of turmoil in South Africa. In the urban areas, a strong alliance was being forged between racially oppressed groups and sympathetic whites. As a...
DEFIANCE CAMPAIGN IN SOUTH AFRICA, RECALLED By E.S Reddy The "Campaign of Defiance against Unjust Laws" - launched jointly by the African National Congress of South Africa and the South African...
Celebrating and commemorating twenty-years of the Harare declaration By Kgolane Alfred Rudolph PHALA. Member of the Provincial Executive Committees of the ANC and SACP in Limpopo Province....
Manifesto of Umkhonto we Sizwe Leaflet issued by the Command of Umkhonto we Sizwe, 16th December 1961 Units of Umkhonto we Sizwe today carried out planned attacks against government installations...
Verwoerd's Grim Plot By NELSON MANDELA No.36, May 1959 South Africa belongs to all who live in if, black and white." - The Freedom Charter. "All the Bantu have their...
From: South Africa's Radical Tradition, a documentary history, Volume One 1907 - 1950, by Allison Drew Document 79 - "What is the Communist Party? Lesson 4: What will be Done in the Bantu...
Publication date: 17 March 1934
Documents: An anonymous Cape Town correspondent, The nineteen days (Sharpeville and the days after.before), this article has been published in SAHO's library and is part of the publication '...
An unpublished paper by E. S. Reddy May 1985 The South African "Freedom Charter" - whose thirtieth anniversary will be observed this year - was adopted at the "Congress of the People" held in...
The landscape of Black political activity in the 1960s was a very different one from that of the previous decade. The apartheid government had shattered the Black resistance movements, in particular...
Beerhalls have always been at the centre of the waves of political turmoil in Johannesburg's African townships. The Johannesburg City Council JCC) opened a beerhall in Western Native Township (WNT)...
DOCUMENT 37. "Black Power--Students Forced to Leave Meeting." Article in Dome (University of Natal), March 27, 1969 Four students of UND [University of Natal-Durban] walked out of a student...
BROTHERS AND SISTERS: Vorster and his assassins have learnt nothing since Sharpeville. Once again he has called out his murderers to shoot down in cold blood innocent people in the name of preserving...
"Memorandum to the Minister of Bantu Administration and Development and Bantu Education by Soweto Black Community Leaders," written by M. T. Moerane, June 29, 1976 (abridged) .... In actual fact...
"Communique" by SASO, July 1969 For the first time after 1959, Non-White student leaders met at Stutterheim in July 1968. A need for contact, especially among the University Colleges, was...
TOMORROW we will commemorate June 16 1976 - the day that saw the start of the Soweto uprising. For almost three decades now, on this day we have remembered the struggle that shaped the generation "1...
Chaos in the African Schools. The reorganisation of the African schools in the wake of the changes governing secondary school entrance led to conditions bordering on chaos. The first step was...
In the first eight weeks of the Revolt in Soweto, there were two periods of intense confrontation with the police. The first extended over the initial three days, from June 16 to 19, and the second...

Pages

Latest Videos in the Archive

Art is an act of resistance. It asserts our agency. Omar Badsha has identified not only as an artist, but an activist for most of his life. Born in 1945, he grew up under the oppression of apartheid, facing injustice on a daily basis. He was harassed, his work was banned, and his movement was restricted. But Badsha fought back with photography. Today his work as a historian is ensuring that the truth of our past, and our future, remains free.     

Badsha discovered his love of politics through his father, being raised in a house where activists came to meet. He had dreams of studying art abroad, but in 1965 was denied a passport by the government. Nevertheless, he continued to create, and that same year one of his woodcuts won the first of many awards. As a man well known for his doggedness, veracity, and humanity, Badsha refused to exhibit his drawings and paintings in segregated galleries. When he joined the trade union movement he turned his eye to photography. Badsha’s first book of photographs, Letter to Farzanah, was banned after release. Now freely accessible, his book depicts the lives of South African children of all races and backgrounds during apartheid. “We came out of a society where our history was actually erased, totally, not recognised,” he says. “But we turned it around during the anti-apartheid struggle.”

Badsha’s extensive photographic work has been exhibited globally, and it’s his emotive images of ordinary people that illustrate the heart behind his activism. In the 1990s, Badsha was finally given his first passport. It was only valid for three months, but the freedom he fought for came soon after as South Africa held its first democratic elections on 27 April 1994. He then founded South African History Online, a non-profit project dedicated to preserving an open history of our country. It’s the largest website of its kind in Africa, and has a virtual classroom to help teach children. In 2017, Badsha was awarded an honorary doctorate by Stellenbosch University. His work serves as a reminder that the pain of our past is not to be forgotten. Instead, it is the key to our future, and our freedom.

External Archives