Evelyn Dalberg, SA opera singer, is born in Germany

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Evelyn Dalberg

Tuesday, 23 May 1939

Evelyn Dalberg, a prominent opera singer in South Africa, was born on 23 May 1939, in Leipzig, Germany. The daughter of Frederick Dalberg and German Soprano Ellen Winter, Dalberg was trained at the Guildhall School of Music in London, where she obtained a Performer's Diploma.

She then began her professional career at Covent Garden in 1953, and went on to sing in TannhÁƒÂƒÂ¤user (Wagner), The Marriage of Figaro (Mozart), and other works at the Coblenz Opera, in Germany. Dalberg also had further singing tuition in Munich, Mannheim and Coblenz.

After Dalberg married German bassoonist Werner Eichler, a member of the Cape Town City Orchestra, she came to South Africa in 1964. She was appointed a lecturer of singing at the South African College of Music in 1967, and sang mezzo-soprano roles for PACT (Performing Arts Council of Transvaal). 

Dalberg also sang for CAPAB (Cape Performing Arts Board) while she continued to lecture, and in 1970 she sung in a NAPAC (Natal Performing Arts Council) production. In 1971, Dalberg sang the role of Amneris (Aida) at the opening of the Nico Malan Opera House in Cape Town, which is now known as The Artscape.

Dalberg made her mark as a prominent opera singer in South Africa with her performances in Un Ballo in Maschera, Falstaff, Martha, Madama Butterfly, Macbeth, Aida and Jenufa.

References:

References:
• South African Classical Singers Evelyn Dalberg Biography [online] Available at: saoperasingers.homestead.com [Accessed 12 May 2009]
•  Wallis, F. (2000) Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar. Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau).

Last updated : 22-May-2015

This article was produced by South African History Online on 16-Mar-2011

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