”The African Mine Workers’ Strike-A National Struggle.”flyer issued by the ANC Youth League, August 1946

The African Mine Workers have risen in revolt against the most brutal, callous and inhuman exploitation of man by man in the history of mankind.

Their struggle is a challenge to the whole economic and political structure of South Africa.

Huge profits from cheap Native Labour are misappropriated by the whites and applied to the perpetuating of white Domination and supremacy in this country and to the tightening of their stranglehold of oppression and suppression on the voiceless toiling and teeming African millions.

The stings of Colour Bar and race discrimination are felt by Africans in all spheres of life—as mine workers, as municipal workers, as railway workers, as domestic servants, as industrial and commercial workers, as farm workers, as teachers, as business men and Africans.

Events are moving towards a climax. Pressure from above is evoking pressure below. Africans—a brave and vigorous race—cannot be kept in subjection for ever. As a matter of fact no human race can be kept in a state of slavery and serfdom forever—so History teaches.

The African National Congress Youth League calls upon all Africans—in all spheres of life and occupation—and employment—to lend active support to the mine workers' struggle. The African Mine Workers' struggle is our struggle. They are fighting political colour bar and economic discrimination against Africans.

Then Brethren, on to the struggle! Although we are physically unarmed yet we are spiritually fortified. We are struggling for a just cause, the very fundamental conditions of human existence. We must remember that in all spheres of human activity it is the spiritual forces that lead the WORLD.
We demand a living wage for all African Workers!!!!

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