Lusikisiki near Port St. John's

Lusikisiki Image source

Lying on Route 61, just inland from the beautiful coastal villages of Port St Johns and Mbotyi, Lusikisiki is wild. The countryside is rugged, remote and untamed, and time has virtually stood still in a part of the world known as ‘God’s country’ or Pondoland. The little town gets its name from the sound of the wind moving through the grass. Here the countryside - a series of rolling hills, lush tropical forests, wide open spaces, untouched beaches and an untamed mystery - supports the local people’s lifestyle that has changed little over the years.
Lusikisiki is a perfect little town in which to experience the beauty of the Wild Coast and the warmth and hospitality of the AmaMpondo people. The AmaMpondo are a welcoming people who traditionally live in huts; old-style and beehive-shaped. Traditionally they have a love of ornaments and beadwork, and are very involved in welcoming visitors to this part of the country.
The dramatic stretch of coastline that lies between Port St Johns and Mkambati Nature Reserve is virtually untouched and an outdoor enthusiast’s paradise. This part of the world, rich in milkwood trees and wildness, has unrivalled access to hiking, mountain biking, canoeing, fishing, surfing, and visits to local villages. Any accommodation is merely an afterthought to house travellers. Essentially the landscape is uncultivated; about enchanting scenery, and wild wildness.
 
"But whilst the untamed beauty, and the views and places one can visit are great, what holds one spellbound here is the silence and peace that this section of the Eastern Cape encompasses with little effort. Staying here is more than a visit to a beautiful part of the world; it is restoration for the soul. Lusikisiki is rugged, unspoilt and unbelievably stunning. The nature reserve was a real treat. This was a perfect holiday for us as a family. The M'bashe lighthouse lies on the Wild Coast, part way between East London and Port St Johns."
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Last updated : 11-Apr-2019

This article was produced by South African History Online on 11-Apr-2019

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