Timeline

1958

The photographer, Peter Magubane, is the first black South African to win the Press Photo of the Year Award.

Albert Newall re-establishes his photography business - Industrial Photography (Pty) Ltd - in Cape Town.

Photographer, Ernest Cole, starts his career as an assistant to Jurgen Schadeberg in design and production at Drum magazine.

1959

Jürgen Schadeberg leaves Drum to pursue a career as a freelance photographer (he joined Drum magazine as their official photographer and layout artist in 1951).

1960

Albert Newall receives a grant from the Cape Tercentenary Foundation to produce a series of images which formed the basis of his book, Images of the Cape, a publication that captured natural and architectural aspects of the region.

Ian Berry, the British born photographer started working for Drum Magazine. He was the first photographer to arrive and photograph the Sharpeville Massacre. His boss, Jim Bailey, the owner of Drum, was afraid of state action against the magazine and had Berry’s photographs flown out to London from where it was syndicated to the world press.

Eli Weinberg, the photographer, trade union activist, and member of the banned South African Communist Party (SACP) is detained for three months under the state of emergency which was declared after the Sharpeville Massacre.

Ernest Cole starts working on his photographic book project, The House of Bondage.

Sam Haskins' exhibition, Photographic Illustration, is held at the Orrco Theatre in Johannesburg.

1962

Jurgen Schadeberg's exhibition, Places & Faces, opens at the Adler Fielding Gallery, Johannesburg.

Sam Haskins book of photographs, Five Girls, is published by Crown Publishers.

Five Girls by Sam Haskins (1962) Five Girls by Sam Haskins (1962)

1963

Jurgen Schadeberg and Peter Magubane exhibit South African Social Scenes; Gorzenich Exhibition Hall, Cologne, Germany.

David Goldblatt starts his career as a full-time commercial photographer.

Peter Magubane leaves Drum Magazine and travels to London.

1964

Peter Magubane held an exhibition of his work at the London School of Printing, becoming the first black South African to be invited to exhibit in London.

Jurgen Schadeberg leaves Drum and relocates to London. During the sixties and seventies, he freelanced as a photojournalist in Europe and America for various prestigious magazines.

Sam Haskin's book, Cowboy Kate & Other Stories, is published by Hieronimi-Verlag in Germany.

Sam Haskins Cowboy Kate and other stories (1964) Sam Haskins Cowboy Kate and other stories (1964)

In September, Eli Weinberg was arrested together with Bram Fischer and held in solitary confinement for seven months. Weinberg was found guilty of being a member of the Central Committee of the underground South African Communist Party (SACP) and was sentenced to five years in prison.

1965

Omar Badsha wins the Basil Schonland Award at the Art South Africa Today exhibition held in Durban for a woodcut titled, Three Penny Game.

The artist and photographer, Albert Newall, releases his book, Images of the Cape, published by Tafelberg- Uitgewers Cape Town.

Albert Newall - Images of the Cape Albert Newall - Images of the Cape

Art South Africa Today exhibition opens at the Durban Municipal Art Gallery (DMAG), Durban.

1966  

Trans-Natal, a group exhibition with Omar Badsha, Bill Ainslie, Dumile Feni, Durant Sihlali, Shireen Timol and Abdul Motala is held at the Natal Society of Arts Gallery (NSA), Durban.

Peter Magubane came back to South Africa and started working for the Rand Daily Mail (RDM). He remained at the RDM until 1980.

Sam Haskins book, Silver Images: A history of photography in South Africa, by Dr A. Bensusan, is published by Howard Timmins.

Silver Images: A history of photography in South Africa, by Dr A. Bensusan Silver Images: A history of photography in South Africa, by Dr A. Bensusan

Cape Town-born Black photographer, George Hallet, holds his first exhibition at The Artists Gallery, Cape Town.

Forty –six South Africans including writers and artists living abroad are banned, which meant that they could not be quoted, teach,  or be in the company of more than two people at a time. In addition, they were required to report to the local police station once a week and were confined to a magisterial district. If the banned person infringed their banning orders, they would end up facing a stiff prison sentence.

1967

The brilliant Pretoria born photojournalist, Ernest Cole's book of photographs on South Africa titled, House of Bondage, is first published by The Gregg Press (USA).

The book, House Bondage, by Ernest Cole, is later published by Random House and is banned by the apartheid government. In addition, the government also imposed a banning order on Ernest Cole in terms of the Suppression of the Terrorism Act – which meant that he could not be quoted inside the country. 

House Bondage, by Ernest Cole House of Bondage, by Ernest Cole (1967)

Sam Haskin's book, November Girl, contained key image collages which formed the basis of many graphic and surrealist experiments in the 1970s and 1980s. In addition, his book, African Image, is also published by Madison Square Press.

1968

George Hallet's photographs of jazz musicians are published in Volume 5 of Contrast Magazine.

Sam Haskins leaves South Africa to settle in London.

Omar Badsha receives the Natal Society of Arts Annual Award.

Omar Badsha exhibits at a group exhibition at the Artists Gallery, Cape Town.

Omar Badsha exhibits at a group show at the 'NSA Annual Members Exhibition.' NSA, Durban.

1969

In June, Peter Magubane was arrested while photographing protesters outside the Pretoria Central Prison where Winnie Mandela was detained. He was interrogated and held in solitary confinement. The charges were dropped a year later, but he was banned from taking any photographs for five years.
 

George Hallet’s photographs are included in a group show titled, New Photography, held at the University of Cape Town.

Omar Badsha is presented with The Sir Ernest Oppenheimer Memorial Award, First Prize Art South Africa Today, in Durban.

1970

In April, Omar Badsha has a one-person exhibition (his first) at the Artists Gallery in Cape Town.

Omar Badsha participates in the exhibition, Graphic Work by Natal Artists, which opened at DMAG, Durban.

Cloete Breytenbach's book, The Spirit of District Six, is published by Purnell, Cape Town.

The Spirit of District Six (1970) The Spirit of District Six (1970)

In April, Eli Weinberg is released from prison and is served with a banning order which restricted him to his house. He had to report to the police station daily. 

1971

In March, Peter Magubane is arrested and spends 98 days in solitary confinement. He is then jailed for six months. When the banning order was lifted, he resumed work for the Rand Daily Mail.

Omar Badsha and Wiseman Mbambo have a group show at Natal Society of Arts, Durban.

Omar Badsha, David Cremer and D. Wilmot exhibit at Nuffield Arcade, Durban.

Omar Badsha exhibits work at Arts South Africa Today, DMAG, Durban.

1972

Sam Haskins book, Haskins Posters, is published by Lichtdruck, Zürich.

Haskins Posters (1972) Haskins Posters (1972)

1973

David Goldblatt’s book, On the Mines, with text by Nadine Gordimer, is published by Struik, Cape Town.

On the Mines (1973)On the Mines (1973)

1974

David Goldblatt holds an exhibition at the Photographer's Gallery, London. It is his first exhibition abroad.

David Goldblatt's work is exhibited at the Panorama 50 Restaurant, Carlton Centre, Johannesburg.

1975

Ben Mclennan begins his career in journalism, working as a photographer for the Daily Dispatch in East London.

David Goldblatt’s seminal book, Some Afrikaners Photographed, is published by Umuzi.

Some Afrikaners Photographed (1975)Some Afrikaners Photographed (1975)

Fanie Jason starts working as a freelance photographer, later joining Drum and Pace magazine in the early 80s.

1976

Bongani Mnugni covers the Soweto Uprising on the 16th of June.

Sam Nzima photographs the iconic image of the wounded body of Hector Peterson being carried by a fellow student with his sister, Antoinette Sithole in deep distress, running alongside her brother's body. 

Peter Magubane covers the Soweto Student uprising – he is detained and released in December.

Market Theatre is established by playwright Barney Simon and others.

Eli Weinberg leaves South Africa for exile on the instructions of the African National Congress (ANC). He lived in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, where he had been granted political asylum.

Lesley Lawson returns to South Africa after completing an interdisciplinary MSc in Liberal Studies in Science, at Manchester University, in the United Kingdom.

1977

Ben Mclennan goes to Zimbabwe (then known as Southern Rhodesia) where he works as a reporter and photographer for the Rhodesian Herald.

David Goldblatt holds a one-person show at the Durban Art Gallery.

Die Klein Karoo ‘n Legkaart, with text by Abraham H. De Vries and photographs by Paul Alberts is published by Tafelberg.

Die Klein Karoo ‘n Legkaart (1977)Die Klein Karoo ‘n Legkaart (1977)

1978

In March, the first edition of the Staffrider Magazine is published by Raven Press and is immediately banned for possession. The edition included photographs by Omar Badsha and Ralph Ndawo.

Staffrider Magazine (1978)Staffrider Magazine (1978)

Peter Magubane is employed as a correspondent for Time magazine.

Paul Weinberg starts his professional career as a photojournalist working for the Natal Witness.

Omar Badsha’s work is included in the exhibition, Some South African Photographers, DMAG, Durban.

Soweto, the book by, Peter Magubane, with text by, Marshall Lee is published by Don Nelson, Cape Town.

Soweto (1978)Soweto (1978)

Black As I Am, a book by Magubane with Zindzi Mandela, is published on the 1st of January, by Guild of Tutors Press and is banned by the government.

Black As I Am (1978)Black As I Am (1978)

Peter Magubane’s book, Magubane's South Africa, is published by Random House.

Magubane's South Africa (1978)Magubane's South Africa (1978)

David Goldblatt, with Carol Hacker and others, establish the Market Photo Gallery – which was the same space as the Market Theatre Gallery – established by artists a few years earlier. 

1979

The book, Letter to Farzanah, by Omar Badsha, with text by Fatima Meer, is published by Institute of Black Research (IBR). The book and exhibition were launched at the Natal Society of Arts Gallery in Durban. The book is immediately banned for distribution. The book was published without the name of Professor Meer as co-author because she was a banned person. This book was published in commemoration of the United Nation’s International Year of the Child.

Letter to Farzanah (1979)Letter to Farzanah (1979)

Paul Alberts exhibition of portraits of South African artists at the Goodman Gallery was the first exhibition at this prestigious art gallery where photography was showed for the first time.

The book, In Camera: Portraits of South African Artists, by Paul Alberts and text by André P Brink is published by H.A.U.M., Cape Town.

In Camera: Portraits of South African Artists (1979)In Camera: Portraits of South African Artists (1979)

George Hallet's book, Images, is published by Black Publishing House, owned by the poet and activist, James Matthews.

Omar Badsha’s exhibition, Letter to Farzanah, opens at the NSA Gallery, Durban.

Omar Badsha’s exhibition, Letter to Farzanah, is held at the Pietermaritzburg Public Library, Pietermaritzburg.

Paul Weinberg teaches photography at the Open School, a community art project started by the Institute of Race Relations (IRR) to train young black youths in the arts.

1980

Peter Magubane leaves South Africa and starts working for TIME in New York.

Children of the Flats, by Paul Alberts, with text by George Gibbs, is published by Reijger Publishers, Cape Town. The book was published in commemoration of the United Nation’s International Year of the Child and internationally distributed.

Children of the Flats (1980)Children of the Flats (1980)

George Hallet is awarded a prize for Outstanding Contributions to Photography by The Hasselblad Camera, Sweden. At this point, he is in exile in Europe. He returned to South Africa to photograph the 1994 elections for the African National Congress.

Cloete Breytenbach's book, Savimbi’s Angola, is published by Howard Timmins.

Savimbi’s Angola (1980)Savimbi’s Angola (1980)

You Have Struck a Rock: Women and Resistance in South Africa, an exhibition co-edited by Omar Badsha and Heather Hughes is held in Durban as part of the first Women's Day celebration which was banned by the government.

Sam Haskins' book, Photo Graphics, is published by RotoVision SA, Geneve.

Photo Graphics (1980)Photo Graphics (1980)

1981

Eli Weinberg dies in exile on the 18th of July, in Dar as Salaam.

Eli Weinberg’s book, Portrait of a People, is published in exile in London by the International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF). A few copies of the book are smuggled into the country.

Portrait of a People (1981)Portrait of a People (1981)

David Goldblatt and Margaret Courtney Clarke’s book, Cape Dutch Homesteads, is published by C Struik Publishers, Cape Town.

Cape Dutch Homesteads (1981)Cape Dutch Homesteads (1981)

Lloyd Spencer starts working for Ravan Press.

In June, Omar Badsha initiated a discussion with Lloyd Spencer that led to a meeting held in the offices of Staffrider magazine on the need to establish a photographers' collective. The meeting involved discussing the establishment of a collective to train young, black photographers to document state repression in the country, and to set up a photographic agency.

The first meeting (attended by Llyod Spencer, Lesley Lawson, Paul Weinberg, Mxolisi Moyo and Biddy Partridge) agrees to discuss the idea of an annual Staffrider photographic exhibition and to take responsibility to compile a regular photo spread for Staffrider Magazine. The meeting also discussed the recruiting of photographers to submit work for the Botswana Culture and Resistance Conference and festival. Paul Weinberg and Lesley Lawson were mandated to approach Bernard Spong, the head of Inter Church Media Project (IMP), to look at the possibility of giving the group office space.

Peter Magubane's book, Soweto Speaks, is published by Ad Donker.

Soweto Speaks (1981)Soweto Speaks (1981)

Young South African Photographers exhibition opens at the South African National Gallery.

Omar Badsha has a solo exhibition at the Market Photographic Gallery, Johannesburg.

Omar Badsha curates a group exhibition which is part of a student cultural festival, held at the University of Durban, Westville (now the University of KwaZulu-Natal – UKZN).

Paul Weinberg is recruited by exiled South African artists, members of the MEDU collective, in Botswana to coordinate the photographic exhibition for the Culture and Resistance Conference and Festival.

Peter McKenzie, Cedric Nunn, Jeeva Rajgopaul and Myron Peters are recruited by Omar Badsha to join Afrapix.

1982

Peter McKenzie leaves Durban for Johannesburg where he starts working with Paul Weinberg and Lesley Lawson to establish the Afrapix office, which was housed at the South African Council of Churches (SACC) headquarters, Khotso House, in central Johannesburg.

Ben Mclennan produces a series of photographs of resettlement camps in Ciskei for the Surplus Peoples Project (SPP), a non-governmental project established in 1979, to investigate forced removals under the Nationalist government’s policy of relocation of people. 

The former Drum photographer, Jurgen Schadeberg, visits South Africa after nearly 20 years abroad.

Gille de Vlieg joins the Black Sash and in 1983, joins the Afrapix photographic collective.

Glynn Griffiths book, Hillbrow, which depicts the life and times of the inner-city residential neighbourhood of Johannesburg, is published by Dan Nelson, with text by Paddi Clay.  

Hillbrow (1982)Hillbrow (1982)

Wendy Schwegmann joins Afrapix, at the time she was freelancing for Reuters and was a regular contributor to Staffrider.

Vuyi Lesley Mbalo starts attending various media workshops including some run by Afrapix, the progressive photo agency, at Khotso House. Mbalo became a member of Afrapix along with his close friend Cecil Sols. During the same period the two also joined the ANC underground. Mbalo and Sols proposed the establishment of a Soweto Afrapix branch, eventually establishing one at Funda Centre.

Jurgen Schadeberg's book, The Kalahari Bushmen Dance, is published by Wildwood House.

The Kalahari Bushmen Dance (1982)The Kalahari Bushmen Dance (1982)

Peter Magubane's book, Black Child, is published by Knopf.

Black Child (1982)Black Child (1982)

David Goldblatt becomes a photographic consultant and later the photographic director of the newly established business magazine Leadership. The magazine went on to publish the work of many young photographers.

David Goldblatt’s book, In Boksburg, is published by Gallery Press, established by the photographer Paul Alberts.

In Boksburg (1982)In Boksburg (1982)

Paul Weinberg works in production for the Interchurch Media Programme, helped IMP together with others to establish Afrascope, a community film unit.

Omar Badsha participates in a group exhibition titled, We Photograph, organised by DMAG (Durban Municipal Arts Gallery).

In July, the Culture and Resistance Conference and arts festival are held in Gaborone. A few hundred artists from South Africa attend the conference which was organised by MEDU and the ANC

Peter McKenzie, a member of Afrapix, presents a paper in the photographic session of the conference.

The conference became an important catalyst in the debate about democratizing culture, freeing it from that of the Apartheid state, fighting against censorship and repression, enforcing the cultural boycott and culture and its role in advancing the struggle against white minority state. The term Cultural worker was now adopted.

The German photographer, Tim Besserer, attends the Botswana Culture and Resistance Conference and  Festival and makes contact with photographers and writers for an exhibition and book on South Africa that he was curating.

Botswana Exhibition

Thirty of the photographers whose work was exhibited at the festival were edited by, Mike Khan. Twelve of the photographers who participated were members, or later became members of Afrapix.

Paul Alberts, Joe Alfers, Vicky Alhadeff, Omar Badsha, Bee Berman, Tessa Colvin, Ivan Gleason, David Goldblatt, Jenny Gordon, Glynn Griffiths, George Hallet, Lesley Lawson, Ashley La Grange, Peter Mackenzie , Jimi Matthews, Glenn Masokoane, Mxolisi Moyo, Juda Ngwenya, Jo Paisley, Biddy Partridge, Myron Peters, Sam Peterson, Wendy Schwegmann, Robert Tshabalala, Paul Weinberg, J. Wolverstone, Gisele Wulfson, Morris Zwi and Jeeva Rajgopaul .

In the wake of the conference, participants went back to their respective provinces and organized mini cultural projects, and established new cultural organizations and projects.

Omar Badsha participated in the group show, South Africa: Photo Statements, at the South African National Gallery in Cape Town.

Omar Badsha‘s Imperial Ghetto is exhibited in an empty shop in Nuffield Gallery, Durban.

Omar Badsha curated a group show at a festival organized by the Creative Arts Society, University of Durban Westville and at a Cultural Festival, held at the University of Natal, Allan Taylor Residence.

Omar Badsha and other members of Afrapix exhibit at Cultural Festival in the Bosmont Township, Johannesburg.

Peter Mckenzie and Omar Badsha are invited to exhibit work at the Botswana National Gallery.

1983

Chris Ledochowski joins Afrapix.

Chris Qwazi starts working for the Daily Sun.

Rafs Mayet is taught the basics of photography by Omar Badsha. Mayet starts working at the Daily Dispatch in East London, and later at the New African in Durban.  He also becomes a member of the Afrapix collective.

Cloete Breytenbach contributes photographs to a book entitled, Cape Town-The Fairest Cape.

Cape Town-The Fairest Cape (1983)Cape Town-The Fairest Cape (1983)

Young South African Photographers, the exhibition opens at the South African National Gallery, Cape Town.

Paul Weinberg exhibits, Side by Side, an essay on Mayfair, multiracial Johannesburg suburb, at the Wits History Workshop Conference from 31 January - 4 February.

David Goldblatt ‘s exhibition, Thirty Fives years of Photographs, opens at the South African National Gallery.

The first Staffrider exhibition, South African through the Lens, opens at the Market Photo Gallery. The editors of the Staffrider photographers annual exhibition are Omar Badsha, Paul Weinberg, and the writer and editor of Staffrider magazine, Chris van Wyk.

The 14 photographers who contributed work to the first Staffrider Photographic Exhibition were Paul Alberts, Joe Alfers, Omar Badsha, Tessa Colvin, Ivan Gieson, David Goldblatt, Lesley Lawson, Peter McKenzie, Mxolisi Moyo, Juda Ngwenya, Sheppard Nompunza, Biddy Partridge, Jeeva Rajgopaul, Karl Sansom, Wendy Schwegmann, Peter Setuke, Paul Weinberg, John Wolverstone and Morris Zwi. Nine of the photographers were members of Afrapix.

Staffrider Exhibition (1983)Staffrider Exhibition (1983)

Paul Alberts’ book, Borders of Apartheid, is published by Gallery Press.

Borders of Apartheid (1983)Borders of Apartheid (1983)

Omar Badsha exhibits his work on Inanda titled, Imijondolo, at the Market Gallery, Johannesburg. Imijondolo was also exhibited at the Merebank Public Library, Durban.

Lesley Lawson starts working on her project titled, Working Women.

Omar Badsha exhibits at the History Conference, University of Natal, KwaZulu-Natal.

1984

On the first of March, the exhibition, Nichts Wird Uns Trennen, on South African photographers and writers opens in Germany. The exhibition travelled around Germany between 1984 and 1988. It showed in 22 cities.

The book, Nichts Wird Uns Trennen, by Tim Besserer on South African photographers and writers is published in Germany.

Nichts Wird Uns Trennen (1984)Nichts Wird Uns Trennen (1984)

25 Photographers participated in this project:

Paul Alberts, Joe Alfers, Omar Badsha, Bee Berman, Harold Carlsson, Mark van Dyk, Ivan Giesen, David Goldblatt, Natalie Goldsmith, Glynn Griffiths, George Hallett, Paul Konings, Lesley Lawson, Ben McLennan, Jimi Matthews, Juda Ngwenya, Cedric Nunn, Myron Peters, Jeeva Rajgopaul, Struan Robertson, Kevin Rudman, Karl Samson, Philip Schedler , Paul Weinberg , Morris Zwi. Eight of the photographers were members of Afrapix.

Cedric Nunn has his first solo exhibition in Bosmont, Johannesburg.

Dave Hartman joins Afrapix

A selection of Paul Konings’ photographs is published in Don Pinnock’s book, The Brotherhoods: Street Gangs and State Controls.

The Brotherhoods: Street Gangs and State Controls (1984)The Brotherhoods: Street Gangs and State Controls (1984)

Women at Work exhibition opens in Johannesburg.

George Hallet's book, Images, is published by BLAC – established by James Matthews.

On the 10th of April, The Carnegie Conference on Poverty and Development and the photographic exhibition, South Africa The Cordoned Heart, curated by Omar Badsha, opens at the University of Cape Town. Twenty photographers participated in the exhibition; nine of the photographers were members of Afrapix.

Paul Alberts, Joseph Alfers, Michael Barry, Omar Badsha, Bee Berman, Michael Davies, David GoldblattPaul Konings, Lesley Lawson, Rashid Lombard, Chris Ledochowski, Jimi Mathews, Ben MacLennan, Gideon Mendel, Cedric Nunn, Myron Peters, Berney Perez, Jeeva Rajgopaul, Wendy Schwegmann and Paul Weinberg

90 Fighting Years - a photographic history of the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) is compiled by Omar Badsha and Roy Padayachie and is published by the Natal Indian Congress to mark the 90th birthday celebrations of the founding of the NIC.

90 Fighting Years (1984)90 Fighting Years (1984)

On the 24th of July, Omar Badsha and Paul Weinberg hold a joint exhibition at the Natal Society of Arts Gallery, Overport. Billy Nair, South African Communist Party (SACP) activist and ex-Robben Island prisoner open the exhibition.

Omar Badsha participates in a group exhibition which formed part of the History Workshop conference, held at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

In the July/August issue the magazine, Creative Camera, carried a special feature on South Africa, as well as an article on Afrapix titled, Going beyond the Image. The issue included photo essays by Paul Weinberg and Omar Badsha.

Pax Magwaza, a Durban Afrapix member, is arrested in the wake of popular resistance against Apartheid after the assassination of Msizi Dube, the Lamontville community leader. He was charged, together with others, for the murder of Sash Kanyile and sentenced to eight years imprisonment.

1985

Lesley Lawson's book, Working Women, is published by The SACHED Trust/Ravan Press in 1985 and Pluto Press in 1986. (SACHED).

Working Women (1985)Working Women (1985)

Pax Magwza is granted the right to appeal his conviction and is released on bail. Immediately upon his release, he approached Omar Badsha, a founding member of Afrapix and fellow activist, whose work he had seen and admired, to take him on as an apprentice photographer. Magwaza started working on a documentary project on Lamontville and was invited to become a member of Afrapix.

Santu Mofokeng joined the Afrapix Collective and started shooting pictures of the anti-apartheid struggle.

South Africa: Who Cares is published by Gallery Press and features the works of Paul Alberts, Bee Berman, Patrick Royal, Paul Weinberg, Ray Hartman and Giselle Wulfsohn.

South Africa: Who Cares (1985)South Africa: Who Cares (1985)

Anna Zieminski moves from Cape Town to Johannesburg to pursue a career as a freelance photographer.

The Annual Staffrider exhibition, edited by Badsha, Weinberg and the writer Chris Van Wyk, opens at the Market Gallery. 

In March, the launch of Omar Badsha's book, Imijondolo – forced removals in the Inanda Area of Durban, with text by, Heather Hughes, is published under the Afrapix label. The book was funded by Badsha and a small grant from  BLAC, a small publishing house run by the poet and activist, James Matthews.

Imijondolo (1985)Imijondolo (1985)

Jurgen Schadeberg returns to South Africa after living in London, Spain, New York and France.

Joe Alfers is granted an Associateship of the South African Institute of Professional Photographers and the Scrimgeour Award for Best Industrial Portfolio.

Festival of the Arts Exhibition is held in Grahamstown, Eastern Cape.

Michaelis Staff and Senior Students Exhibition opens at the Market Photo Gallery in Johannesburg.

In November, new curbs were introduced which included a ban on publishing photographs of "unrest". In March 1986, the State of Emergency was lifted, but re-imposed on the 12th of June, with "considerably tougher" regulations, this time affecting the whole country.

1986

Ben Mclennan's, A Proper Degree of Terror: John Graham and the Cape's Eastern Frontier, is published by Ravan Press.

A Proper Degree of Terror: John Graham and the Cape's Eastern Frontier (1986)A Proper Degree of Terror: John Graham and the Cape's Eastern Frontier (1986)

Chris Ledochowski exhibits a solo show, Hand Coloured Portraits from the Cape Flats, at the Market Photo Gallery, Johannesburg.

Guy Tillim joins Afrapix.

Steve Hilton Barber joins Afrapix and works as a stringer for Reuters in the Eastern Cape

Sandi Smit, a member of Afrapix, is detained under the State of Emergency Regulations in Johannesburg.

Growing Up In a Divided Society: The Contexts of Childhood in South Africa is published by Ravan Press (editors: Dr Pamela Reynolds and Dr Sandra Berman).

Growing Up In a Divided Society: The Contexts of Childhood in South Africa (1986)Growing Up In a Divided Society: The Contexts of Childhood in South Africa (1986)

Mbalo and Sols set up an independent organisation called, Phosdoc, while continuing to contribute to the Afrapix library. Mbalo also worked for the New Nation newspaper.

South Africa in Conflict – by the End Conscription Campaign - an exhibition of Afrapix and other photographers is presented at the Baxter Theatre, Cape Town.

Santu Mofokeng's, Train Church, in which he began his ongoing exploration of religious rituals and the displacement of places of worship, is considered his first photographic essay.

Train Church (1986)Train Church (1986)

David Goldblatt exhibition opens at The Photographers' Gallery, London. (11 April - 17 May)

South Africa - The Cordoned Heart – book and exhibition opens at the International Centre for Photography (ICP), New York, United States of America (USA). Copies of the exhibition showed in Europe: The Photographers' Gallery, London. (4 April - 10 May). The Christian Aid and Oxfam toured the exhibition to different centres in the UK.  Frankfurt, Germany (16 June - August). The editor, Omar Badsha, is refused a passport to attend the launch. The book was jointly published by Gallery Press and Aperture Publishing and funded by the Carnegie Corporation of America.

South Africa - The Cordoned Heart (1986)South Africa - The Cordoned Heart (1986)

Lesley Lawsons’s book, Working Women: A Portrait of South Africa's Women Workers, is published by Ravan Press.

The Weekly Mail Book Week included a group exhibition of the work of South African Photographers. Omar Badsha is one of the speakers at the book week in Cape Town.

Pax Magwaza loses his appeal and goes back to serve his prison sentence. He lodges another appeal in the Supreme Court Appellate Division and is again released on bail. He continues working as a photographer and member of Afrapix.

The annual Staffrider photographic exhibition is held at the Market Gallery.

David Goldblatt's book, Lifetimes Under Apartheid, with text by Nadine Gordimer is published by, Alfred A Knopf, in New York.

Lifetimes Under Apartheid (1986)Lifetimes Under Apartheid (1986)

Paul Weinberg co-ordinated the exhibition, The Shaken Roots, which included a photographic essay by Jurgen Schadeberg on the San people, photographed in 1959. The exhibition opened at the Market Photo Gallery, in Johannesburg, and then showed at the University of Cape Town.

Peter Magubane's book, June 16: The Fruit of Fear, is published by Skotaville Publishers.

June 16: The Fruit of Fear (1986)June 16: The Fruit of Fear (1986)

1987

In January, Omar Badsha is appointed to head the Documentary Photography Project at the University of Cape Town (UCT).

Roger Meintjies joins Afrapix.

Omar Badsha participates in a group exhibition at the History Workshop, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

Omar Badsha has a one-person show at the Shell Gallery, Cape Town.

Cedric Nunn's exhibition, Stop the Killings, opens at the University of Durban-Westville, Durban.

Exhibition - The Finest Photos from the Old Drum opens at Shell Gallery, Cape Town; Durban Museum, Durban; Market Gallery, Johannesburg; South Africa.

Ben Mclennan's book, Glenmore: The story of a forced removal, is published by the South African Institute of Race Relations.

Glenmore: The Story of a Forced Removal (1987)Glenmore: The Story of a Forced Removal (1987)

Eric Miller's book titled, Thula Baba, is published by Ravan Press.

Thula Baba (1987)Thula Baba (1987)

Joe Alfers’ photographic essay, Fishing People of Kosi Bay, results in an exhibition of photographs shown at the Documentary Photographers Conference at the University of Cape Town.

Jurgen Schadeberg releases two books:

The Finest Photos from the Old Drum, (Bailey's Photo Archives, Johannesburg).

The Finest Photos from the Old Drum (1987)The Finest Photos from the Old Drum (1987)

The Fifties People of South Africa, (Bailey's Photo Archives, Johannesburg).

The Fifties People of South Africa (1987)The Fifties People of South Africa (1987)

In December, The Culture in Another South Africa (CASA) festival and conference is held in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Forty-eight photographers participated, but only thirty-two peoples work was chosen. Restrictions on the taking of photographs are extended to restrictions on the circulation of already taken photographs, an issue explored in the exhibition, The Hidden Camera. Within the framework of calls for political involvement in the arts, CASA concerned itself not only with “the prevailing ruling class culture” and already democratized culture in apartheid South Africa but also with the cultural boycott and the future of culture in non-racial and democratic South Africa.

As part of CASA, the works of thirty-two South African photographers, edited by Badsha, was exhibited as, The Hidden Camera: South African Photography Escapes Censorship. A book by the same name with an introductory text by Paul Weinberg was published in 1989. Badsha did not attend CASA because he did not have a passport.

The photographers who participated in the exhibition were:

Omar Badsha, Santu Mofokeng, Paul Weinberg, Martin Steven, George Lucy, Jimi Matthews, Fanie Jason, Rashid Lombard, Lesley Lawson, Roger Mentjes , Jenny Gordon, David Goldblatt, Jeeva Rajgopaul, Herbert Mabuza, Billy Paddock , Cedric Nunn, Ingrid Hudson, Gille de Vlieg, Paul Grendon, Chris Ledochowski, Gisele Wulfsohn, Trevor Samson, Dave Hartman, Chris Qwazi, Eric Miller, Julian Cobbing, Vuyi Mbalo, Guy Tillim, Steve Hilton Barber, Bongani Mnguni, John Liebenberg, Adil Bradlow, Gideon Mendel.

1988

Anna Zieminski becomes a member of Afrapix. At the same time, she also worked on personal documentary projects including, Women's Hostel, in Alexandra Township, Johannesburg and the Inner City of Johannesburg.

Paul Alberts', The Forgotten Highway (Through Ceres and the Bokkeveld), is published by The Gallery Press, Cape Town, (text: Dene Smuts) (The book was also published in Afrikaans.)

The Forgotten Highway (Through Ceres and the Bokkeveld) (1988)The Forgotten Highway (Through Ceres and the Bokkeveld) (1988)

Ellen Elmendorp joins Afrapix as a picture editor.

Steve Hilton Barber becomes Afrapix's photographic editor and marketing manager.

Roger Meintjes completes his BA Fine Arts degree, majoring in photography.

Exhibition - Arts Festival, Baxter Theatre, Cape Town - photographic exhibition curated by photographers Rashid Lombard and Gavin Pieterse.

John Liebenberg's exhibition, Images of Today, is held in Swakopmund, Namibia.

Namaqualand Exhibition for Surplus People's Project, Cape Town.

Human Rights Exhibition, For the Black Sash.

Jurgen Schadeberg exhibits, A Retrospective, at Market Gallery, Johannesburg.

The book, Ten Years of Staffrider, is launched at the Market Gallery together with an exhibition of photographs.

Ten Years of Staffrider (1988)Ten Years of Staffrider (1988)

The book, From South Africa: New Writing, Photographs, and Art, by David Bunn and Jane Taylor, which contains a number of photographic essays is published by University of Chicago Press.

From South Africa: New Writing, Photographs, and Art (1988)From South Africa: New Writing, Photographs, and Art (1988)

In July, Omar Badsha, as the head of the Documentary Photography Project at UCT, organises the first documentary photography conference. Badsha is detained the night before the opening of the conference in terms of the Suppression of the Communism Act – which prescribes the definite detention of opponents of the state.

At the suggestion of the photographer David Goldblatt and the historian Tim Couzens, Mofokeng was invited to join the African Studies Institute (ASI), where he stayed for almost ten years as a researcher and photographer. There he produced his photographic essay Rumours/ The Bloemhof Portfolio, which constitutes a genuine archive of rural life in South Africa based on research and investigation.

The exhibition, Children on the Frontline, curated by Omar Badsha, opens at a Conference on Children on the Front Line, Harare, Zimbabwe.

Exhibition of Omar Badsha’s work is held as part of the Human Rights Conference, Port Elizabeth. Group exhibition.

Omar Badsha curates a photographic exhibition for the United Women’s Congress (UWCO) Festival, Samaj Centre, Cape Town.

Dave Hartman leaves the country and goes into exile.

Julian Cobbing's essay titled, The Mfecane as Alibi: Thoughts on Dithakong and Mbolompo, is included in The Journal of African History, Volume 29, Issue 3 - Published by Cambridge University Press.

Pax Magwaza loses his second appeal. This time he decides to go into hiding in the “Independent” Transkei Homeland. After representation by his attorneys, an agreement is reached with the authorities that if he returns to South Africa and serves a full month, his sentence would be regarded as completed.

1989      

The book, The Hidden Camera, published by the CASA Foundation, showcased thirty-two photographers. Twenty-one of the photographers were linked to Afrapix.

The Hidden Camera (1989)The Hidden Camera (1989)

Paul Weinberg and Santu Mofokeng’s exhibition, Going Home, opens in Pietermaritzburg and Cape Town.

Gideon Mendel’s exhibition, Beloofde Land, opens on 19 March, at the Market Gallery and was sponsored by the Afrikaans magazine Vrye Weekblad.

David Goldblatt's book, The Transported of KwaNdebele, is published by Aperture Books.

The Transported of KwaNdebele (1989)The Transported of KwaNdebele (1989)

Beyond the Barricades, an Afrapix project edited by Omar Badsha, Paul Weinberg and Gideon Mendel, is published by IDAF. It showed the work of twenty photographers, fourteen of whom belonged to Afrapix. The book is published with Lesley Lawson and Alex Harris as editors because the editors were afraid that they could fall foul of the emergency legislation.

Beyond the Barricades (1989)Beyond the Barricades (1989)

Beyond the Barricades, the exhibition opens at the Market Photo Gallery, Johannesburg. Photographers that contributed to the exhibition were Omar Badsha , Julian CobbingPaul GrendonDave Hartman, Steve Hilton Barber, Rashid LombardRoger Meintjes, Gideon Mendel , Eric Miller, Santu Mofokeng, Themba Nkosi, Cedric Nunn, Billy Paddock , Myron Peters, Chris Qwazi, Jeeva Rajgopaul, Guy Tillim, Zubeida Vallie, Gille De Vlieg and Paul Weinberg.

John Liebenberg's exhibition, The Rainy Season, is held at The Market Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Paul Weinberg's book, Shaken Roots: The Bushmen of Namibia, is published by EDA publishers with text by Megan Biesele.

Shaken Roots: The Bushmen of Namibia (1989)Shaken Roots: The Bushmen of Namibia (1989)

Pax Magwaza, upon his release, moves to Pietermaritzburg and continues his career as a photographer. He later applied for and was granted amnesty by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

1990

Ben Mclennan's book, Apartheid: The Lighter Side, is published by Chameleon Press.

Apartheid: The Lighter Side (1990)Apartheid: The Lighter Side (1990)

The Unbreakable Thread: Non-Racialism in South Africa by Julie Frederikse is published by Ravan Press. (A large number of photographs were taken by Afrapix members).

The Unbreakable Thread: Non-Racialism in South Africa (1990)The Unbreakable Thread: Non-Racialism in South Africa (1990)

Ernest Cole dies in New York on 19 February.

All our Children, a joint Afrapix/Vumani exhibition is held at the South African National Gallery, Cape Town. Photographers included: Gill de Vlieg, Paul Grendon, Steve Hilton-Barber, Chris Ledochowski, Pax Magwaza, Roger Meintjies, Santu Mofokeng, Eric Miller, Cedric Nunn, Guy Tillim, Paul Weinberg and Anna Zieminski.

Graham Goddard prints Namibia Exhibition, by John Liebenberg (Exhibited at the Market Gallery, Johannesburg) and Paul Weinberg’s Namaqualand Exhibition.

Santu Mofokeng's first solo exhibition, Like Shifting Sand, for which he received an AA Vita Award Nomination, is held at the Market Gallery, Johannesburg.

In November, Steve Hilton Barber’s photographic essay, The Savage Noble and the Noble Savages. Photography and an African Initiation, engendered much debate and a great deal of controversy at the Market Gallery. Amid the controversy, the photographs were stolen from the walls of the Market Theatre's gallery.

Steve Hilton Barber and Paul Weinberg, together with other white members, leave Afrapix and work with David Goldblatt to establish the photographic agency, Southlight, which later became South Photos.

John Liebenberg exhibitions:

The Eye of the Elephant, Namibian Arts Association, Windhoek, Namibia
Independence exhibition India, Department Arts and Culture Namibia, Windhoek, Namibia
The Eye of the Elephant, The Great Hall , University of the Witwatersrand, for the South African Institute of International Affairs, Johannesburg
Photographs from Namibia, for the End Conscription Campaign (ECC), East London

Jurgen Schadeberg's book, Nelson Mandela and the Rise of the ANC, is compiled and edited by Jürgen Schadeberg, and published by Bloomsbury Pub Ltd.

Nelson Mandela and the Rise of the ANC (1990)Nelson Mandela and the Rise of the ANC (1990)

In June, Afrapix publishes ‘Full Frame’, a first alternative photographic magazine. The thirty-five page magazine was co-edited by Guy Tillim, Paul Weinberg and Steve Hilton Barber.

Peter Magubane's, Soweto: Portrait of a City, with text by David Bristow is published by Struik Publishers.

Soweto: Portrait of a City (1990)Soweto: Portrait of a City (1990)

Steve Hilton Barber receives Staffrider Award for, Voelvry, a series on alternative, dissident Afrikaans music tour.

Steve Hilton Barber receives Institute of Professional Photographers Awards and Staffrider Award for Initiation series.

Omar Badsha becomes the head of ANC Western Cape Arts and Cultural Desk.

Roger Meintjes leaves the Afrapix collective and after the transition to a democratic government, moves into the field of museums and curating.

1991

Centre for Documentary Photography, headed by Omar Badsha organises the Ernest Cole and Eli Weinberg scholarships awards – the aim was to send two photographers to spend three months at International Centre for Photography (ICP) in New York and at Duke University, United States of America (USA). Santu Mofokeng was the recipient of the Ernest Cole award, and Jeeva Rajgopaul the recipient of the Eli Weinberg award.

In January, Jeeva Rajgopaul leaves to take up the Eli Weinberg scholarship at the ICP in New York, USA.

Jo'burg City, Who's City, an IDASA exhibition, opens at Johannesburg Art Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Jürgen Schadeberg's book, Drum, The Fifties Pictures from South Africa, is published by Rogner & Bernhard.

Drum, The Fifties Pictures from South Africa (1991)Drum, The Fifties Pictures from South Africa (1991)

John Liebenberg exhibits:

The Marriage, an exhibition of post independent Namibia, The Namibian Arts Association, Windhoek, Namibia. The Eye of the Elephant, The Baxter Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa.

In June, Jeeva Rajgopaul returns to South Africa after six months at the ICP in New York.

Omar Badsha curates an exhibition for the ANC 1991 National Conference, at the University of Durban Westville (now university of KwaZulu-Natal – UKZN), Durban. He organises a unit of photographers to document the first ANC Conference on home soil since its banning in 1960. The unit comprised Omar Badsha, Jeeva Rajgopaul, Myron Peters, Mark Truebody and Mandisa [SURNAME UNKNOWN]

In June, Afrapix the collective and agency is forced to close its operations because the signatory to the organisations bank account belonged to, Paul Weinberg, and the bulk of the White members left the organisation to join, David Goldblatt, to established a new photo agency, South Light. 

Staffrider Magazine runs Steve Hilton Barber’s photographic essay on the North Sotho Initiates. The essay also won the Staffrider Photographic Award.

The IDAF archive returns to South Africa and is housed at the University of Western Cape (UWC) Mayibuye Archive.

1992

Steve Hilton Barber starts working at the Saturday Star.

Santu Mofokeng received the 1st Mother Jones Award for Africa – a grant made to outstanding world photographers covering social issues. The award marked the beginning of international recognition and critical acclaim for Mofokeng’s work.

Ellen Elmendorp wins the Fuji Award for her pictures of Orania, an exclusively white settlement in the Northern Cape.

Omar Badsha participates in, Visual Arts Group. Travelling exhibition: Zolani Centre, Nyanga East; Uluntu Centre, Guguletu; Manenberg Peoples Centre, Cape Town; South African Association of Arts, Cape Town. Group exhibition.

1993

Picturing Our World - Images of the Western Cape, an exhibition for the Grahamstown National Arts Festival.

Peter Magubane's book, Women of South Africa: Their Fight for Freedom, with text by Carol Lazar is published by Bulfinch Press.

Women of South Africa: Their Fight for Freedom (1993)Women of South Africa: Their Fight for Freedom (1993)

Chris Ledochowski's exhibition Ten Years After - A Return to Nthabalala Village, Venda, is exhibited at the Mayibuye Centre, UWC.

Beyond the Handshake, an exhibition by Gideon Mendel for Mayibuye Centre and Oxfam Zambian Soccer Exhibition which won him a World Press Photo Award.

South African Military Buildings Photographed: An Historical Heritage, is published by The Gallery Press, Cape Town - compiled and photographed by Paul Alberts; Foreword by Mr Justice M R de Kock, Chairman: National Monuments Council.

South African Military Buildings Photographed: An Historical Heritage (1993)South African Military Buildings Photographed: An Historical Heritage (1993)

Roger Meintjies photographs are presented in a book called, A Bed Called Home - Life In The Migrant Labour Hostels Of Cape Town, by Mamphela Ramphele.

A Bed Called Home - Life In The Migrant Labour Hostels Of Cape Town (1993)A Bed Called Home - Life In The Migrant Labour Hostels Of Cape Town (1993)

Steve Hilton Barber starts working at the Mail and Guardian.

1994

Santu Mofokeng's exhibition, Rumours / The Bloemhof Portfolio, opens at the Market Gallery, Johannesburg.

Exhibition - Apartheid and Resistance, for Mayibuye Centre (which accompanied the 'Anne Frank in the World' exhibition around South Africa).

South African Muslim Tricentennial Photographic Exhibition, Margins To Mainstream, for the Mayibuye Centre which opened at the Standard Bank National Arts Festival in Grahamstown; also exhibited at the Midlands Art Centre in Birmingham, England) and featured the works of six South African photographers: Eli Weinberg; Leon Levson; Willie De Klerk; Bob Gosani; Ernest Cole and Ranjith Kally.

This Land is Our Land exhibition opens at the Tatham Art Gallery in Pietermaritzburg and runs from the 21 July - 7 August. It contained works by: Paul Weinberg, Cedric Nunn, Santu Mofokeng and Paul Grendon.           

John Liebenberg's book, Namibia, is published by Revue Noire.

Namibia (1994)Namibia (1994)

John Liebenberg's exhibition, Namibia of Today, is held at The French Cultural Centre, Windhoek, Namibia.

Jurgen Schadeberg's book, Voices from Robben Island, is published by Ravan Press.

Voices from Robben Island (1994)Voices from Robben Island (1994)

Rafs Mayet starts working for the Independent Electoral Commission during the first democratic elections; some of these pictures depicting the event were published in a book called, An End to Waiting.

An End to Waiting (1994)An End to Waiting (1994)

Paul Weinberg headed a team of photographers which recorded the activities of the Independent Electoral Commission, tasked with staging South Africa’s first democratic elections. The photographs are held in the archives of the Electoral Commission and were published in a book entitled, An End to Waiting: South       Africa’s first democratic elections, 1995. Weinberg’s images form an important part of this collection.

1995

Jane Alexander wins the Standard Bank's Young Artists Award.

People's Portraits, the group exhibition is held at the South African National Gallery, Cape Town. It featured work by Anna Zieminski and more South African photographers.

Paul Weinberg's exhibition, The Forgotten People, opens at Market Gallery, Johannesburg.

Cedric Nunn's exhibition, The Hidden Years, opens at the KwaMuhle Museum, Durban.

Santu Mofokeng's exhibition, Distorting Mirror: Townships Imagined, opens at the Worker's Library, Johannesburg.

Africus, Black Looks White Myths, First Johannesburg Biennale exhibition is held at MuseumAfrica, Johannesburg.

Chris Ledochowski's Hand Coloured Photos in Ceramic Frames: A Collaboration between              Photographer and Ceramist is exhibited at the Cape Gallery in Cape Town.

George Hallet's Images of Change, with text by Pallo Jordan is published by Nolwazi Educational Publishers, Johannesburg.

Images of Change (1995)Images of Change (1995)

Jurgen Schadeberg's Sof'Town Blues; Images from the Black '50s, is published by Creda Press, Cape Town.

Sof'Town Blues; Images from the Black '50s (1995)Sof'Town Blues; Images from the Black '50s (1995)

Paul Weinberg's book, An End to Waiting, is published by Independent Electoral Commission (South Africa's 1994 elections).

An End to Waiting (1995)An End to Waiting (1995)

1996

Peter McKenzie becomes the co-ordinator and facilitator of the Photojournalism Department at the Institute for the Advancement of Journalism in Johannesburg.

Barricaded Rainbow exhibition opens at Centre for African Studies, University of Cape Town.

National Women’s Day exhibition opens at House of Parliament, Cape Town. Group exhibition.

Portraits of Power: Profiles of a Changing South Africa, is published by David Philip Publishers. Features by Henner Frankenfield ,Ruth Motau, Anna Zieminski, Angela Buckland and Paul Weinberg.

Portraits of Power: Profiles of a Changing South Africa (1996)Portraits of Power: Profiles of a Changing South Africa (1996)

Portraits exhibition opens at the South African National Gallery, Cape Town. Group exhibition

25 Years of Photojournalism exhibition is held in Cape Town, Johannesburg, and the UK. Group exhibition

Photo Synthesis: Contemporary South African Photography, opens at the South African National Gallery. Group exhibition

Grahamstown Festival exhibition is held in Grahamstown. Group exhibition

Anna Zieminski takes on the position of 'photo stringer' for international news agency Agence France-Presse (AFP).

Peter Magubane's, Nelson Mandela, Man of Destiny is published by D. Nelson Publishers.

Nelson Mandela, Man of Destiny (1996)Nelson Mandela, Man of Destiny (1996)

Jurgen Schadeberg A Retrospective exhibition is held at the South African National Gallery in Cape Town and the Oliewenhuise National Gallery, Bloemfontein.

Paul Weinberg's, Footprints in the Sand, exhibition on the San of Southern Africa opens at the South African National Gallery and Museum of Ethnology, Rotterdam (1997). 

1997

Rashid Lombard establishes ESPAfrika. The Cape-based company is responsible for the largest jazz multi-event in the southern hemisphere, the North Sea Jazz Festival.

Paul Alberts' Some Evidence of Things Seen: Children of South Africa, is published by Open Hand Press, Rivonia (Introduction: Nelson Mandela; Text, among others, by Desmond TutuAlbie Sachs, National Children’s Rights Committee, Unicef.)

Some Evidence of Things Seen: Children of South Africa (1997)Some Evidence of Things Seen: Children of South Africa (1997)

Paul Alberts' Meditation: A Path to Consciousness, is published by Human & Rousseau, Cape Town, (text: Merwede van der Merwe).

Cedric Nunn's exhibition, Malhawu, is held at the Macufe Arts Festival in Bloemfontein.

Cedric Nunn's exhibition, Blood Relatives, opens at the Playhouse in Durban.

NGO Coalition exhibition is held in Johannesburg. Photographers that participated in the exhibition: Cedric Nunn (more to follow).

South African National Gallery Contemporary Collection exhibition opens in Cape Town.

Paul Weinberg's Back to the Land, is published by Porcupine Press (a book on the return to land of dispossessed South Africans).

Back to the Land (1997)Back to the Land (1997)

Santu Mofokeng's exhibition, Chasing Shadows, opens at Gertrude Posel Gallery, at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

Steve Hilton Barber establishes Exposure Multi Media Agency, Nelspruit, South Africa.

1998

Eye Africa – African Photography 1840-1998 – International travelling exhibition, Castle of Good Hope, Cape Town. Group exhibition. Featured works by Omar Badsha, Gideon Mendel, Peter Magubane, Santu Mofokeng and David Goldblatt.

National Development Agency exhibition is held at the Workers Library, Johannesburg. Cedric Nunn featured in this exhibition.

Ten Photographers – exhibition opens at  A.R.T. Gallery, Paarl, South Africa. (Anna Zieminski, Tracey Derrick, Strijdom van der Merwe, Rodger Bosch, Lien Botha, Mark Coetzee, Tessa Frootko Gordon, Geoff Grundlingh, Ronnie Levitan and John Martin).

David Goldblatt's book, South Africa: The Structure of Things Then, is published in Cape Town by Oxford University Press.

South Africa: The Structure of Things Then (1998)South Africa: The Structure of Things Then (1998)

Guy Tillim receives the Mondi Award (South Africa) for photojournalism for his essay of images entitled: Congo River - Journey from Kinsangani to Kinshasa.

Jurgen Schadeberg's exhibition, Selected Images, opens at the Institute for the Advancement of Journalism, Johannesburg, and the Freedom Forum, Johannesburg; South Africa.

Paul Weinberg's book Fault Lines is published by University of California Press – a book on South Africa written by David Goodman.

Fault Lines (1998)Fault Lines (1998)

Steve Hilton Barber's, It's Wildlife exhibition opens at Promenade Concourse, Nelspruit,                 Mpumalanga.

Steve Hilton Barber - Maputo Corridor Photographic Exhibition is held at the National Parliament in Cape Town, at Riverside Mall in Nelspruit, and at the Lubombo Border Post in Maputo.

Rafs Mayet takes part in the African Photography Festival in Bamako, Mali and has his first solo exhibition Look-Hear at the NSA Gallery in Durban. He is one of twelve South African photographers who submit an essay for the show, Blank - Architecture and Apartheid, which is commissioned by the Netherlands Architectural Institute that opens in Rotterdam, in November.

1999

John Liebenberg's book, Anthology of African and Indian Ocean Photography (also exists in French and Portuguese) is published by Revue Noire.

Anthology of African and Indian Ocean Photography (1999)Anthology of African and Indian Ocean Photography (1999)

Workers exhibition opens at The Workers Library and Museum, Johannesburg.

David Goldblatt's exhibition, Structures, opens at Johannesburg Art Gallery.

Kaapse Vlakte - Through The Lens, a photographic exhibition for Southern Images Photographic Agency. Part of the One City Many Cultures Festival.

Paul Alberts is recognised by the University of the Orange Free State as one of a hundred leading South African citizens of the Free State and the Northern Cape of the past millennium.

Paul Weinberg's book, In Search of the San, is published by Porcupine Press – photographs and text on the lives of modern Bushmen.

In Search of the San (1999)In Search of the San (1999)

2000

Omar Badsha establishes South African History Online (SAHO) – a non-profit online history and heritage project.

Every Child is my Child exhibition is held at Office of the State President. African Window Museum, Pretoria, South Africa. (Anna Zieminski, Cedric Nunn, Rafs Mayet) More to follow.

Emotions and Relations, an exhibition curated by Hentie van der Merwe opens at the Sandton Civic Gallery, Johannesburg.

Living in a Strange Land, a group exhibition, is held at Parliament, Cape Town. Cedric Nunn participated in the exhibition.

Peter Magubane's book, African Renaissance is published by Struik.

African Renaissance (2000)African Renaissance (2000)

Paul Weinberg’s book, Once We Were Hunters, is published by David Philip, Cape Town and Mets & Schilt, Amsterdam.

Once We Were Hunters (2000)Once We Were Hunters (2000)

Jurgen Schadeberg's exhibition, The Naked Face, opens at Sandton Civic Art Gallery, Johannesburg.

Jurgen Schadeberg's exhibition, Faced, opens at Carfax Gallery, Johannesburg

Peter McKenzie exhibits at the Annual Festival of Photography, Pretoria.

Santu Mofokeng's exhibition, Sad Landscapes opens at Camouflage Gallery, Johannesburg.

2001

David Goldblatt's book, Phaidon 55, is published in London by Phaidon Press Ltd.

Phaidon 55 (2001)Phaidon 55 (2001)

David Goldblatt's work, Fifty-One Years, is published in Barcelona: Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona by (MACBA / Actar).

Fifty-One Years (2001)Fifty-One Years (2001)

David Goldblatt is awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts, University of Cape Town.

Gideon Mendel's book of photographs, A Broken Landscape: HIV and AIDS in Africa, is published by Network Photographers.

A Broken Landscape: HIV and AIDS in Africa (2001)A Broken Landscape: HIV and AIDS in Africa (2001)

Guy Tillim's book of photographs, Jo'burg, is published by STE Publishers.

Jo'burg (2001)Jo'burg (2001)

Jurgen Schadeberg exhibits work, Soweto 2001, at Art On Paper Gallery, Johannesburg

Jurgen Schadeberg photographs, The White Fifties, is exhibited at Crake Gallery, Johannesburg, Bensusan Museum of Photography.

Omar Badsha book, Imperial Ghetto, a study of life in the Grey Street complex of Durban is published by SAHO.

Imperial Ghetto (2001)Imperial Ghetto (2001)

Omar Badsha edits the exhibition and book, With Our Own Hands: Alleviating Poverty in South Africa, published by the Department of Public Works and SAHO. The exhibition opened at Parliament in Cape Town. Photographers work that featured in the book and exhibition: Omar Badsha, Liam Lynch, Cedric Nunn, Jeeva Rajgopaul and Andrew Tshabangu.

With Our Own Hands: Alleviating Poverty in South Africa (2001)With Our Own Hands: Alleviating Poverty in South Africa (2001)

Omar Badsha's exhibition titled, Imperial Ghetto, opens at DMAG, Durban.

Omar Badsha's Narratives, Graven Images and Rituals exhibition opens at Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.

With Our Own Hands exhibition opens at the University of South Africa, Pretoria.

Paul Weinberg's exhibits his work The Fisherfolk of Kosi Bay, at Month of Photography, Cape Town.

Steve Hilton Barber wins the Fuji Press Photographer Awards for People in the News and Features, Johannesburg, South Africa.

2002

Amulets & Dreams: War, Youth & Change in Africa is published by South African History Online (SAHO) and features photographs by Omar Badsha and Guy Tillim.

Amulets & Dreams: War, Youth & Change in Africa (2002)Amulets & Dreams: War, Youth & Change in Africa (2002)

Fanie Jason receives Judges' Special Recognition Award in the International Fund for Documentary Photograph (Fifty Crows Foundation) for his Aids essay, Life in Denial.

Environmental Images, a group exhibition opens at PhotoZa, Johannesburg. Features photographs by Jurgen Schadeberg

Jurgen Schadeberg releases three books:

The Black & White Fifties published by Protea Bookhouse

The Black & White Fifties (2002)The Black & White Fifties (2002)

Soweto Today published by Protea Bookhouse

Soweto Today (2002)Soweto Today (2002)

The San of the Kalahari 1959' published by Protea Bookhouse

The San of the Kalahari 1959 (2002)The San of the Kalahari 1959 (2002)

Jurgen Schadeberg exhibition, The Black & White Fifties' & 'Soweto Today touring with The Alliance Francaise - Opened at The Pretoria Art Museum, 8 city tour.

Jurgen Schadeberg exhibits Voices from the Past - Moving Stills over 50 years - Goethe Institute Johannesburg.

Jurgen Schadeberg exhibits The San of the Kalahari 1959 - RAU Art Gallery, Johannesburg.

SAHO exhibition, Bonani Africa Festival of Photography, edited by Omar Badsha and is held at Museum Africa, Johannesburg and Pretoria Art Gallery, Pretoria.

Paul Alberts is awarded a Medal of Honour for his work as social documentary photographer by the South African Academy of Science and Arts.

Paul Weinberg's, Once We Were Hunters, exhibition is part of Month of Photography, SA Museum, Cape Town.

Paul Weinberg's exhibition and book, Durban: Impressions of an African City, opens at the NSA Gallery, Durban.

Durban: Impressions of an African City, is published by Porcupine Press with David Robbins and Gcina Mhlophe.

Durban: Impressions of an African City (2002)Durban: Impressions of an African City (2002)

2003

Peter Magubane and Sandra Klopper co authored the book: Homesteads, Dress and Adornment, Ceremonies and Arts and Craft, as part of an African Heritage series published by Struik Publishers (Pty) Ltd.

Homesteads, Dress and Adornment, Ceremonies and Arts and Craft (2003)Homesteads, Dress and Adornment, Ceremonies and Arts and Craft (2003)

From 18 June - 19 July Guy Tillim's Soldiers exhibition, as well as, Departure, is held at the Stevenson Gallery, Cape Town. The book, Departure, was published the same year by Michael Stevenson Contemporary & Bell-Roberts Publishing.

Departure (2003)Departure (2003)

Jurgen Schadeberg exhibits his work, All that Jazz: 52 Years of Jazz Images, Standard Bank Art Gallery, Johannesburg.

Omar Badsha curates the August 9 Celebrating Women exhibition held at University of Kwa-Natal, Westville Campus.

Paul Alberts is assigned by the War Museum in Bloemfontein to edit and compile a major exhibition, Suffering of War, that depicted the suffering of both Boer and British soldiers, as well as citizens, animals and the countryside during the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902).

Additions to this time line are still in progress.

Sources in Our Archive

Collections in the Archives